Risk
8/30/2010
10:24 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Security Questions To Ask Your Cloud Provider

NeoSpire's director of security, Sean Bruton, discusses the realities of cloud security and the key questions to ask when assessing a hosted or cloud service provider's claims.




Slideshow: Cloud Security Pros And Cons
(click for larger image and for full photo gallery)
IT resources like data, server applications, databases, e-mail, and internal or external web applications require a task list of security measures. The size and composition of that list depends on how concerned you are, like whether you care if your customer list or next year's plans are snarfed up and sold to your competition.

And some of it depends on what industry you're in, and in turn, how much and many government and industry regulations your company is subject to... and the penalties if something happens or even if you simply fail an audit.

For example, if personal data like social security or credit card numbers have been potentially exposed -- an unencrypted tape, disk, or notebook gone astray; a Wi-Fi access point left vulnerable -- it can cost twenty dollars or more per user to alert them, plus regulators may decide to whack you in the wallet. This is true whether you're housing the data inside your own company, or outside with a third-party provider like a managed hosting service; a public, private or hybrid cloud; or a tape storage firm.

And even most companies that do house their primary data store internally will still need some offsite storage, whether for business continuity/disaster recovery, archival offsite backup, or compliance requirements. So these companies have to assess whether to do these backups themselves, or farm it out.

Sean Bruton, director of security for managed hosting provider NeoSpire, talked about some of the security issues, concerns, and to-do's that a company should consider before selecting any outside hosting company or service... or electing to keep things inside.

InformationWeek SMB: First, let's start by clarifying the question: what are the relative securities and insecurities of where your company's data lives -- in a data center in your company, or in an external company, like a managed service provider, or a public or private cloud vendor?

Bruton: The first thing you're interested in, in terms of security, is the company hosting your data. What controls are in place, as a company? For example, what is the internal control in terms of who has access, physical locations, what audits do they go through during the year, and the amount of visibility they're willing to offer customers into those controls and audits.

Previous
1 of 4
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Partner Perspectives
What's This?
In a digital world inundated with advanced security threats, Intel Security seeks to transform how we live and work to keep our information secure. Through hardware and software development, Intel Security delivers robust solutions that integrate security into every layer of every digital device. In combining the security expertise of McAfee with the innovation, performance, and trust of Intel, this vision becomes a reality.

As we rely on technology to enhance our everyday and business life, we must too consider the security of the intellectual property and confidential data that is housed on these devices. As we increase the number of devices we use, we increase the number of gateways and opportunity for security threats. Intel Security takes the “security connected” approach to ensure that every device is secure, and that all security solutions are seamlessly integrated.
Featured Writers
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading's October Tech Digest
Fast data analysis can stymie attacks and strengthen enterprise security. Does your team have the data smarts?
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-3409
Published: 2014-10-25
The Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) handling feature in Cisco IOS 12.2(33)SRE9a and earlier and IOS XE 3.13S and earlier allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (device reload) via malformed CFM packets, aka Bug ID CSCuq93406.

CVE-2014-4620
Published: 2014-10-25
The EMC NetWorker Module for MEDITECH (aka NMMEDI) 3.0 build 87 through 90, when EMC RecoverPoint and Plink are used, stores cleartext RecoverPoint Appliance credentials in nsrmedisv.raw log files, which allows local users to obtain sensitive information by reading these files.

CVE-2014-4623
Published: 2014-10-25
EMC Avamar 6.0.x, 6.1.x, and 7.0.x in Avamar Data Store (ADS) GEN4(S) and Avamar Virtual Edition (AVE), when Password Hardening before 2.0.0.4 is enabled, uses UNIX DES crypt for password hashing, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to obtain cleartext passwords via a brute-force a...

CVE-2014-4624
Published: 2014-10-25
EMC Avamar Data Store (ADS) and Avamar Virtual Edition (AVE) 6.x and 7.0.x through 7.0.2-43 do not require authentication for Java API calls, which allows remote attackers to discover grid MCUser and GSAN passwords via a crafted call.

CVE-2014-6151
Published: 2014-10-25
CRLF injection vulnerability in IBM Tivoli Integrated Portal (TIP) 2.2.x allows remote authenticated users to inject arbitrary HTTP headers and conduct HTTP response splitting attacks via unspecified vectors.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Follow Dark Reading editors into the field as they talk with noted experts from the security world.