Risk
5/27/2009
12:23 PM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
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Security Benchmarks For Apple iPhone Released

Today the Center for Internet Security released a set of benchmarks designed to help consumers and businesses alike communicate using their favorite toy. Whoops, I meant smartphone. The guidance is worth a look.

Today the Center for Internet Security released a set of benchmarks designed to help consumers and businesses alike communicate using their favorite toy. Whoops, I meant smartphone. The guidance is worth a look.My biggest personal iPhone security related gaffe: I recently traveled through a train station and two airports in a day without turning on Airplane Mode -- which shuts down Wi-Fi and Bluetooth signals. Being the information security geek that I am, this oversight forced me to have to reset the phone to factory settings then restore it when I got to my hotel room.

The settings in the guide include updating to the latest Apple firmware as soon as the device is bought (this is something I'm under the assumption that happens as soon as you connect the new phone to iTunes anyway). But it doesn't hurt to make certain that the most recent firmware is installed, currently 2.2.1.

Other advice includes maintain Airplane mode when security is crucial (such as crowded places), disable Wi-Fi, don't automatically join networks, turn off Bluetooth, location services as well as JavaScript and plug-ins, turn on autolock and maintain a password.

Most of the advice I do agree with, and it will make your iPhone, or fleet of iPhones, a lot less fun to use. I mean, the benchmarks will make the iPhone more secure.

You can grab a copy of the benchmarks here.

If you're interested in my mobile technology and security updates, feel free to follow me on Twitter.

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