03:45 PM

Samsung Offers Self-Encrypting SSDs

Dell says it plans to offer the drives in laptops in the coming months.

Samsung Electronics on Thursday introduced what the company claims are the first hardware-based self-encrypting solid-state drives.

The 256-, 128-, and 64-GB SSDs provide full-disk encryption using Wave Systems' technology, which activates and manages the encryption. Computer maker Dell said it plans to offer the drives in laptops in the coming months.

Samsung claims the added security does not affect the performance of the SSDs, which will be available in 1.8- and 2.5-inch form factors. The company also claims to be the first to offer SSDs that incorporate hardware-based encryption.

Such encryption provides better security than the software alternative, because encryption keys and access credentials are generated and stored within the drive hardware, making it more difficult to hack, according to Samsung.

Wave's Embassy Trusted Drive Manager, which will come bundled with each Samsung SSD, will manage pre-boot authentication to the drive and enable administrators to set up users. The technology also enables backup of drive credentials.

In general, SSDs, which have no moving parts and use flash memory for storage, are more reliable and faster than hard disk drives. SSDs are also lighter, which is a plus for laptops.

However, the drives also have their problems. For example, review site PC Perspective found that Intel's X25-M SSDs degraded in performance with extensive use, a problem that has been said of other SSDs. Intel has said that the workloads used by the site did not reflect real-world use.

Along with degradation problems, SSDs also are considerably more expensive than HDDs. As a result, many experts advise using the drives only when their advantages are really needed.

Besides laptops, SSDs also are making their way in the data center as complements to hard disk arrays. Companies providing server-based SSDs include Fusion-io, Texas Memory Systems, and Super Talent.

InformationWeek Analytics has published an independent analysis of the challenges around enterprise storage. Download the report here (registration required).

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
Five Emerging Security Threats - And What You Can Learn From Them
At Black Hat USA, researchers unveiled some nasty vulnerabilities. Is your organization ready?
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
According to industry estimates, about a million new IT security jobs will be created in the next two years but there aren't enough skilled professionals to fill them. On top of that, there isn't necessarily a clear path to a career in security. Dark Reading Executive Editor Kelly Jackson Higgins hosts guests Carson Sweet, co-founder and CTO of CloudPassage, which published a shocking study of the security gap in top US undergrad computer science programs, and Rodney Petersen, head of NIST's new National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education.