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2/14/2008
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Novell Delivers PCI Solution

Novell delivers solution for payment card industry standard

WALTHAM, Mass. -- Novell today announced a significant enhancement to its security and information event management solution, Novell(R) Sentinel(TM), that will help retailers meet the detailed requirements of the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS). One of the most critical compliance requirements for online and endpoint point-of-sale merchants, financial institutions, credit and debit card processors and credit card companies, PCI-DSS protects consumers from data fraud and identity theft by providing stringent guidelines for merchants on how to safeguard credit card information at various points in the payment process. The Novell PCI Solution enables retailers to easily demonstrate compliance with PCI-DSS and is the industry's most effective solution for automation, validation and end-to-end management of the PCI process.

"Proving compliance with the more than 160 specific requirements of PCI-DSS creates obvious new challenges for IT departments," said Sally Hudson, research director, Security Products and Services of IDC. "Few organizations have the infrastructure and resources in place to achieve compliance with these far-reaching requirements quickly. And with continual deadlines and increasing enforcement, it makes sense for enterprises to adopt a carefully planned strategic approach to data security that addresses compliance issues, automates PCI-DSS requirements and enhances other IT and end-user operations."

Novell Inc. (Nasdaq: NOVL)

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