Risk
2/21/2012
05:12 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

NIST Cybersecurity Center Tackles Public And Private Threats

Researchers will use National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence to develop new products and services to combat cybersecurity threats faced by U.S. government agencies and companies.

Inside DHS' Classified Cyber-Coordination Headquarters
(click image for larger view)
Slideshow: Inside DHS' Classified Cyber-Coordination Headquarters
The organization that sets federal technology standards is establishing a new center devoted to cybersecurity technology research across both the public and private sectors.

A partnership between the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), the state of Maryland, and Montgomery County, Md., will create the National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence, where NIST researchers can exclusively work to improve cybersecurity in the United States, according to NIST.

The goals of the center, which is being funded by $10 million of NIST's budget for fiscal-year 2012, will be to establish more trust in U.S. IT communications, data, and storage systems; lower the risk for companies and people using those systems; and develop new cybersecurity products and services, according to NIST.

To do this, the center will team researchers with users and vendors of cybersecurity products and services to do specific work that considers use cases to address challenges in particular sectors. For example, researchers might create interoperable templates that can be used across industries or government agencies in areas such as cloud computing, cryptography, or continuous monitoring of IT systems, according to NIST.

[ Find out how NIST works to protect mobile devices. See NIST Tests Ways To Secure iPhones, iPads. ]

"Cyber crime hurts individuals, businesses and government agencies," NIST undersecretary of commerce for standards and technology and director Patrick Gallagher said in a press statement to launch the center. "We want to bring together the best minds and provide them with the best tools to create and test solutions that will make online transactions of all kinds safer."

NIST is encouraging IT vendors and members of the public to help develop and refine the use cases, and researchers will share results from the center's projects with the IT and vendor communities, according to NIST.

A new computing facility near NIST's campus in Gaithersburg, Md., will house the center, which will host collaborative research efforts that institutions from both public and private-sector computer scientists can participate in. NIST already has done a significant amount of cybersecurity work in the area of setting standards for the federal government, and the center will provide a new venue for the organization to broaden its research to the private sector.

Some recent moves NIST has made include providing guidance to help agencies assess risk within their IT systems to prevent federal cybersecurity breaches. It has also offered guidelines for protecting a computer's Basic Input/Output System (BIOS).

As federal agencies embrace devices and apps to meet employee demand, the White House seeks one comprehensive mobile strategy. Also in the new Going Mobile issue of InformationWeek Government: Find out how the National Security Agency is developing technologies to make commercial devices suitable for intelligence work. (Free registration required.)

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Partner Perspectives
What's This?
In a digital world inundated with advanced security threats, Intel Security seeks to transform how we live and work to keep our information secure. Through hardware and software development, Intel Security delivers robust solutions that integrate security into every layer of every digital device. In combining the security expertise of McAfee with the innovation, performance, and trust of Intel, this vision becomes a reality.

As we rely on technology to enhance our everyday and business life, we must too consider the security of the intellectual property and confidential data that is housed on these devices. As we increase the number of devices we use, we increase the number of gateways and opportunity for security threats. Intel Security takes the “security connected” approach to ensure that every device is secure, and that all security solutions are seamlessly integrated.
Featured Writers
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading's October Tech Digest
Fast data analysis can stymie attacks and strengthen enterprise security. Does your team have the data smarts?
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-3409
Published: 2014-10-25
The Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) handling feature in Cisco IOS 12.2(33)SRE9a and earlier and IOS XE 3.13S and earlier allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (device reload) via malformed CFM packets, aka Bug ID CSCuq93406.

CVE-2014-4620
Published: 2014-10-25
The EMC NetWorker Module for MEDITECH (aka NMMEDI) 3.0 build 87 through 90, when EMC RecoverPoint and Plink are used, stores cleartext RecoverPoint Appliance credentials in nsrmedisv.raw log files, which allows local users to obtain sensitive information by reading these files.

CVE-2014-4623
Published: 2014-10-25
EMC Avamar 6.0.x, 6.1.x, and 7.0.x in Avamar Data Store (ADS) GEN4(S) and Avamar Virtual Edition (AVE), when Password Hardening before 2.0.0.4 is enabled, uses UNIX DES crypt for password hashing, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to obtain cleartext passwords via a brute-force a...

CVE-2014-4624
Published: 2014-10-25
EMC Avamar Data Store (ADS) and Avamar Virtual Edition (AVE) 6.x and 7.0.x through 7.0.2-43 do not require authentication for Java API calls, which allows remote attackers to discover grid MCUser and GSAN passwords via a crafted call.

CVE-2014-6151
Published: 2014-10-25
CRLF injection vulnerability in IBM Tivoli Integrated Portal (TIP) 2.2.x allows remote authenticated users to inject arbitrary HTTP headers and conduct HTTP response splitting attacks via unspecified vectors.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Follow Dark Reading editors into the field as they talk with noted experts from the security world.