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12/14/2012
02:04 PM
John Foley
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Military Drones Present And Future: Visual Tour

The Pentagon's growing fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles ranges from hand-launched machines to the Air Force's experimental X-37B space plane.
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The Multi-Use Technology Testbed, a.k.a. Mutt, is a small, unmanned aircraft developed by the Air Force Research Lab to test technologies for use in new kinds of lightweight, flexible aircraft. It's one of the Air Force's so-called X planes, this one designated the X-56A. The 7.5-foot-long aircraft has a 28-foot wingspan and is being built by Lockheed Martin.

Image credit: Air Force Research Lab/Lockheed Martin

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jc
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jc,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2013 | 6:42:33 PM
re: Military Drones Present And Future: Visual Tour
Phantom Ray looks exactly like a 1950s cartoon of a UFO. Perhaps they've been test flying these things prior to last year!
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2013 | 3:55:35 PM
re: Military Drones Present And Future: Visual Tour
It might alarm you to learn that the use of surveillance drones has been authorized by executive order over U.S. skies. It's all part of the post-9/11, police-state mentality that gave rise to the Patriot Act and other tramplings upon personal freedoms and privacy that could easily be abused...
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