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11/2/2010
01:25 PM
50%
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Lookout Rolls Android Privacy App

Tool scans smartphone apps and reveals which are accessing private identity, location, and information.

Top 20 Android Productivity Apps
(click image for larger view)
Slideshow: Top 20 Android Productivity Apps

Lookout Mobile Security on Tuesday unveiled its Lookout Premium for Android for enhanced smartphone protection. The cloud-based Lookout Premium's new Privacy Advisor feature gives users visibility into and control of their personal information when they access smartphone apps.

Privacy Advisor will let users scan every app they download and discover which can access their private data, including identity information, location, and messages. Detailed reports on the apps' capabilities on their phones are also available for users to view, Lookout said. The smartphone security provider said it has gained more than three million users in less than a year.

"Lookout Premium provides smartphone owners the peace of mind to explore everything that the new mobile world offers safely by providing added security, data protection, and visibility into personal information being accessed by the apps on their phones," said John Hering, CEO and founder of Lookout Mobile Security, in a statement.

Security and data privacy concerns are increasing with the rapid adoption of smartphones and the amount of data and proprietary information users have on their devices. On average, users have 31 apps on their phones that can access their identity information, according to Lookout, along with 19 apps that access their location, and five apps that access their SMS and MMS messages.

More than 91% of consumers have some level of concern about the privacy of information on their phone and only 7% said they feel very confident they understand what private information is being accessed on their phone, according to a recent study, Lookout said.

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