Risk
3/30/2007
02:49 PM
Mitch Wagner
Mitch Wagner
Commentary
50%
50%

Is The Mac More Secure Than Windows? Does It Matter?

Is the Mac more secure than Windows, in some absolute measurement of security? And does it really matter? Senior writer Sharon Gaudin talked to a few security experts and reported the consensus that, despite a recent increase in reported security flaws, the Mac is still more secure than Windows. But it's doubtful that'll change anybody's buying decisions -- Windows users know that their software has security pr

Is the Mac more secure than Windows, in some absolute measurement of security? And does it really matter? Senior writer Sharon Gaudin talked to a few security experts and reported the consensus that, despite a recent increase in reported security flaws, the Mac is still more secure than Windows. But it's doubtful that'll change anybody's buying decisions -- Windows users know that their software has security problems, and yet they use it anyway.

McAfee last year said that reported Mac vulnerabilities increased 228% in the past three years, compared with a 73% increase for Windows. And Apple is lagging behind Microsoft in issuing bug fixes, with Apple taking an average of 66 days to patch vulnerabilities, while Microsoft took three weeks.

But the Mac is still safer than Windows, says Johannes Ullrich, chief research officer at the SANS Institute. It's just not as safe as Apple pretends it is.

Read the rest of the article for more information and discussion.

The security comparison is interesting information. But just how useful is it? I've never encountered anyone who cited security as a reason for buying a Mac. They buy a Mac for stability, ease of use, because they're doing graphics or multimedia or some other application for which the Mac is best. They buy a Mac out of desire to stick it to Microsoft, for which many people in the user community have an irrational hatred. But I've never heard anybody say, "I bought a Mac because it's more secure."

Let's hear it from the Mac users out there. Why'd you go with the Mac?

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-0543
Published: 2015-07-05
EMC Secure Remote Services Virtual Edition (ESRS VE) 3.x before 3.06 does not properly verify X.509 certificates from SSL servers, which allows man-in-the-middle attackers to spoof servers and obtain sensitive information via a crafted certificate.

CVE-2015-0544
Published: 2015-07-05
EMC Secure Remote Services Virtual Edition (ESRS VE) 3.x before 3.06 does not properly generate random values for session cookies, which makes it easier for remote attackers to hijack sessions by predicting a value.

CVE-2015-2721
Published: 2015-07-05
Mozilla Network Security Services (NSS) before 3.19, as used in Mozilla Firefox before 39.0, Firefox ESR 31.x before 31.8 and 38.x before 38.1, Thunderbird before 38.1, and other products, does not properly determine state transitions for the TLS state machine, which allows man-in-the-middle attacke...

CVE-2015-2722
Published: 2015-07-05
Use-after-free vulnerability in the CanonicalizeXPCOMParticipant function in Mozilla Firefox before 39.0 and Firefox ESR 31.x before 31.8 and 38.x before 38.1 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via vectors involving attachment of an XMLHttpRequest object to a shared worker.

CVE-2015-2724
Published: 2015-07-05
Multiple unspecified vulnerabilities in the browser engine in Mozilla Firefox before 39.0, Firefox ESR 31.x before 31.8 and 38.x before 38.1, and Thunderbird before 38.1 allow remote attackers to cause a denial of service (memory corruption and application crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code v...

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Marc Spitler, co-author of the Verizon DBIR will share some of the lesser-known but most intriguing tidbits from the massive report