Risk
3/1/2008
08:09 PM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
50%
50%

Is That A Trojan Calling?

Numerous security researchers, including the US-CERT, are warning of a new Trojan that attempts to attack Microsoft Windows Mobile Devices. Is that threat anything to worry about?

Numerous security researchers, including the US-CERT, are warning of a new Trojan that attempts to attack Microsoft Windows Mobile Devices. Is that threat anything to worry about?Maybe not. Unless you live or are doing business in China. According to the US-CERT, the Trojan affects Microsoft Windows CE, and can disable this operating system's application installation security capabilities.

According to a blog on security vendor McAfee's Web site, this new Trojan, named WinCE/InfoJack, transmits an infected device's serial number, operating system version, and other information to the malware's creator. Also, according to McAfee, WinCE/InfoJack has been found packed within legitimate installation files, including Google Maps, stock market applications, as well as game bundles. McAfee noted that the Trojan has been widely distributed.

In addition to disabling application security settings by allowing the installation of unsigned code, the Trojan could take any, if not all, of the following actions:

Spread via legitimate-seeming installation files; install as an autorun program on the targeted device's memory card; can spread to another device when an infected memory card is inserted

While this doesn't sound extremely dangerous, and McAfee ranks the threat as low, the Trojan creator is collecting this information for some reason. And with the rising popularity of smartphones, attacks designed specifically for them are bound to rise.

While I've long postponed investing in the hassle of antivirus software designed specifically for mobile devices, it may be time to reconsider. Especially if you're apt to install lots of applications.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Five Emerging Security Threats - And What You Can Learn From Them
At Black Hat USA, researchers unveiled some nasty vulnerabilities. Is your organization ready?
Flash Poll
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-7445
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

CVE-2015-4948
Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-5660
Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

CVE-2015-6003
Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

CVE-2015-6333
Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Cybercrime has become a well-organized business, complete with job specialization, funding, and online customer service. Dark Reading editors speak to cybercrime experts on the evolution of the cybercrime economy and the nature of today's attackers.