Risk
10/30/2008
01:17 PM
Keith Ferrell
Keith Ferrell
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Halloween Treats: Ghouls, Goblins And -- Backups!

Maxell has a good, timely suggestion:in addition to traditional Halloween activities (whether allowed in your workplace or not) use Halloween as the day you begin (or re-commmit to) regular backups of your data.

Maxell has a good, timely suggestion:in addition to traditional Halloween activities (whether allowed in your workplace or not) use Halloween as the day you begin (or re-commmit to) regular backups of your data.Maxell has picked Halloween as the day for this year's Fall Backup campaign, and it's a nice idea.

Citing a Harris/Symantec survey, the storage media company notes that 43 percent of us don't back up anything, at all, ever.

Sounds about right, based on the number of times I've been asked to help people find lost and un-backed data (and the occasions when I've found myself in the same position, to be frank.)

What I like about the Maxell promotion (other than their advice not to re-use storage media for your backups: they are in the business to do business, after all) is the linkage of backup to a calendar event. Halloween's convenient, but it's easy enough to extend the idea to make backups and holidays regular events, like so:

Unstuff that turkey of a computer and back it up!

Unwrap your presents under the tree and then backup your entire directory tree!

Won't you be my Valentine? Only if your data is backed up!

Declare an Day of Independence from un-backed-up data!

You get the idea.

So does Maxell: it's easy to put off, forget or just plain ignore the need to back up your data. By making a holiday or event's arrival the arrival as well of a reminder to do your backups you're one step closer to actually getting them done.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2012-3946
Published: 2014-04-24
Cisco IOS before 15.3(2)S allows remote attackers to bypass interface ACL restrictions in opportunistic circumstances by sending IPv6 packets in an unspecified scenario in which expected packet drops do not occur for "a small percentage" of the packets, aka Bug ID CSCty73682.

CVE-2012-5723
Published: 2014-04-24
Cisco ASR 1000 devices with software before 3.8S, when BDI routing is enabled, allow remote attackers to cause a denial of service (device reload) via crafted (1) broadcast or (2) multicast ICMP packets with fragmentation, aka Bug ID CSCub55948.

CVE-2013-6738
Published: 2014-04-24
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in IBM SmartCloud Analytics Log Analysis 1.1 and 1.2 before 1.2.0.0-CSI-SCALA-IF0003 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via an invalid query parameter in a response from an OAuth authorization endpoint.

CVE-2014-0188
Published: 2014-04-24
The openshift-origin-broker in Red Hat OpenShift Enterprise 2.0.5, 1.2.7, and earlier does not properly handle authentication requests from the remote-user auth plugin, which allows remote attackers to bypass authentication and impersonate arbitrary users via the X-Remote-User header in a request to...

CVE-2014-2391
Published: 2014-04-24
The password recovery service in Open-Xchange AppSuite before 7.2.2-rev20, 7.4.1 before 7.4.1-rev11, and 7.4.2 before 7.4.2-rev13 makes an improper decision about the sensitivity of a string representing a previously used but currently invalid password, which allows remote attackers to obtain potent...

Best of the Web