Risk
6/28/2010
04:52 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Google Admitted To Colorado, Iowa Schools

Savings and availability from anywhere figure into educators' interest, Google says.

Google on Monday said that two more states have given the green light for interested school districts to begin using the company's Web-based applications.

Following Oregon's decision in April to allow its school districts to deploy Google Apps for Education, Colorado and Iowa have agreed to make Google Apps available to over 3,000 schools in the two states.

Google Apps for Education includes Gmail, Docs, Sites, Calendar, Video, and Groups.




Image Gallery: Top 10 Google Videos
(click for larger image and for full photo gallery)

While adoption of Google Apps for Education is optional, the service appears to be popular among public school districts in Oregon. Two months ago, Steve Nelson, technology director of Oregon Virtual Schools, said he expected that about 50% of Oregon's almost 200 public school districts would sign up to use Google's online applications in the following 12 months.

Google also said that it is introducing a suite of training solutions and a new online Google Apps Education Training Center to help educators understand Google Apps better.

In addition, Google said that it is extending its promotional security offering to primary and secondary schools. The promotion, which provides free Google Message Security e-mail filtering, was introduced last summer and was scheduled to conclude next month. It will now continue to be available through the end of the year.

On Friday, Google said that it had completed moving its encrypted search service from https://www.google.com to https://encrypted.google.com. The move, announced two weeks ago, was undertaken to allow school administrators to block the use of encrypted search, without interfering with other Google authenticated services.

The company said it is looking into ways to allow encrypted search back on Google.com without compromising school administrators' oversight capabilities.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Flash Poll
Current Issue
Cartoon
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-6117
Published: 2014-07-11
Dahua DVR 2.608.0000.0 and 2.608.GV00.0 allows remote attackers to bypass authentication and obtain sensitive information including user credentials, change user passwords, clear log files, and perform other actions via a request to TCP port 37777.

CVE-2014-0174
Published: 2014-07-11
Cumin (aka MRG Management Console), as used in Red Hat Enterprise MRG 2.5, does not include the HTTPOnly flag in a Set-Cookie header for the session cookie, which makes it easier for remote attackers to obtain potentially sensitive information via script access to this cookie.

CVE-2014-3485
Published: 2014-07-11
The REST API in the ovirt-engine in oVirt, as used in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (rhevm) 3.4, allows remote authenticated users to read arbitrary files and have other unspecified impact via unknown vectors, related to an XML External Entity (XXE) issue.

CVE-2014-3499
Published: 2014-07-11
Docker 1.0.0 uses world-readable and world-writable permissions on the management socket, which allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2014-3503
Published: 2014-07-11
Apache Syncope 1.1.x before 1.1.8 uses weak random values to generate passwords, which makes it easier for remote attackers to guess the password via a brute force attack.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Marilyn Cohodas and her guests look at the evolving nature of the relationship between CIO and CSO.