Risk
10/28/2009
12:25 PM
Bob Evans
Bob Evans
Commentary
50%
50%

Global CIO: Greenpeace Shakedown Targets Google, Microsoft, And IBM

Greenpeace is mounting a major assault on the business practices of not just those three companies but the entire IT industry. They will lie to get what they want--and here's the proof.

If you think I'm exaggerating, take a look at the very words spoken a few months ago by Geir Leipold, Dear Leader of Greenpeace at the time, about the group's assertions and his own assertions that the Greenland Ice Sheet would be gone by 2030, just 20 years from now. This exchange came in an interview with the BBC, and I'm sure Leipold and his fellow travelers were drooling at the thought of being able to pump out their dishonest propaganda through the usually fawning BBC outlet.

Unfortunately for Leipold—and fortunately for the rest of us—the BBC reporter was armed with facts and undeterred by dogma. And again I point this out in the context of Greenpeace's current effort to use its velvet-glove name to hide its brass-knuckles attack on the IT industry. Here's the second half of the exchange (and at the bottom of this column I've provided links to the 100-second clip plus a few other goodies):

Leipold: "That we, as a pressure group, have to emotionalize issues—we're not ashamed of emotionalizing issues. I think it's a fact—"

BBC reporter Stephen Sackur: "You call it emotionalizing, others would call it scare tactics. Will you sit here now and tell me that you in all honesty do not believe that the Greenland Ice Sheet is going to melt by 2030?"

Leipold: "I don't know—I don't think it will be melting by 2030."

BBC: "So in fact would you say that it was a mistake for your organization to put that out?"

Leipold: "That may have been a mistake—I don't know this specific press release—I do not check every press release."

Oh my. So the Dear Leader goes from saying the Greenland Ice Sheet will be gone by 2030, to saying that he doesn't know after all, to saying that he doesn't think it will be melting by then, to saying that it might have been a mistake for his fellow shakedowners to put out the press release making those preposterous claims, to washing his hands of it by saying he's too busy to check what "emotionalizing" claims his "pressure group" is making.

So think of that when you see the attempts by Greenpeace to smear IBM, Microsoft, and Google, three magnificent private enterprises with superb environmental track records and philanthropic missions. Because to the shakedown artists, none of that matters—their goal is control, influence, and power to undercut free enterprise and force this country and then other industrial powers to take a few steps back toward the Stone Age.

Don't be fooled by the name. And to IBM, Google, and Microsoft: continue to stand up for yourselves and your excellent principles, and don't be fooled into thinking that if you acquiesce to this latest round of nonsense from the screechers, that they'll let you go next time. No, it'll be quite the opposite: if you give in now, they'll know that you'll give in next time, and they won't stop until they've done enormous damage to you, your shareholders, your employees, and others in the IT industry with the unmitigated gall to oppose their sacrosanct vision for how everyone else should behave.

Don't be fooled by the name.

Recommended Resources:

100-second clip with Leipold and BBC

full interview with Leipold and BBC

Some compelling counterbalance to Greenpeace lunacy

Don't believe the name

Previous
2 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Security Operations and IT Operations: Finding the Path to Collaboration
A wide gulf has emerged between SOC and NOC teams that's keeping both of them from assuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of IT systems. Here's how experts think it should be bridged.
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In past years, security researchers have discovered ways to hack cars, medical devices, automated teller machines, and many other targets. Dark Reading Executive Editor Kelly Jackson Higgins hosts researcher Samy Kamkar and Levi Gundert, vice president of threat intelligence at Recorded Future, to discuss some of 2016's most unusual and creative hacks by white hats, and what these new vulnerabilities might mean for the coming year.