Risk
10/28/2009
12:25 PM
Bob Evans
Bob Evans
Commentary
50%
50%

Global CIO: Greenpeace Shakedown Targets Google, Microsoft, And IBM

Greenpeace is mounting a major assault on the business practices of not just those three companies but the entire IT industry. They will lie to get what they want--and here's the proof.

If you think I'm exaggerating, take a look at the very words spoken a few months ago by Geir Leipold, Dear Leader of Greenpeace at the time, about the group's assertions and his own assertions that the Greenland Ice Sheet would be gone by 2030, just 20 years from now. This exchange came in an interview with the BBC, and I'm sure Leipold and his fellow travelers were drooling at the thought of being able to pump out their dishonest propaganda through the usually fawning BBC outlet.

Unfortunately for Leipold—and fortunately for the rest of us—the BBC reporter was armed with facts and undeterred by dogma. And again I point this out in the context of Greenpeace's current effort to use its velvet-glove name to hide its brass-knuckles attack on the IT industry. Here's the second half of the exchange (and at the bottom of this column I've provided links to the 100-second clip plus a few other goodies):

Leipold: "That we, as a pressure group, have to emotionalize issues—we're not ashamed of emotionalizing issues. I think it's a fact—"

BBC reporter Stephen Sackur: "You call it emotionalizing, others would call it scare tactics. Will you sit here now and tell me that you in all honesty do not believe that the Greenland Ice Sheet is going to melt by 2030?"

Leipold: "I don't know—I don't think it will be melting by 2030."

BBC: "So in fact would you say that it was a mistake for your organization to put that out?"

Leipold: "That may have been a mistake—I don't know this specific press release—I do not check every press release."

Oh my. So the Dear Leader goes from saying the Greenland Ice Sheet will be gone by 2030, to saying that he doesn't know after all, to saying that he doesn't think it will be melting by then, to saying that it might have been a mistake for his fellow shakedowners to put out the press release making those preposterous claims, to washing his hands of it by saying he's too busy to check what "emotionalizing" claims his "pressure group" is making.

So think of that when you see the attempts by Greenpeace to smear IBM, Microsoft, and Google, three magnificent private enterprises with superb environmental track records and philanthropic missions. Because to the shakedown artists, none of that matters—their goal is control, influence, and power to undercut free enterprise and force this country and then other industrial powers to take a few steps back toward the Stone Age.

Don't be fooled by the name. And to IBM, Google, and Microsoft: continue to stand up for yourselves and your excellent principles, and don't be fooled into thinking that if you acquiesce to this latest round of nonsense from the screechers, that they'll let you go next time. No, it'll be quite the opposite: if you give in now, they'll know that you'll give in next time, and they won't stop until they've done enormous damage to you, your shareholders, your employees, and others in the IT industry with the unmitigated gall to oppose their sacrosanct vision for how everyone else should behave.

Don't be fooled by the name.

Recommended Resources:

100-second clip with Leipold and BBC

full interview with Leipold and BBC

Some compelling counterbalance to Greenpeace lunacy

Don't believe the name

Previous
2 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading Tech Digest, Dec. 19, 2014
Software-defined networking can be a net plus for security. The key: Work with the network team to implement gradually, test as you go, and take the opportunity to overhaul your security strategy.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-4440
Published: 2014-12-19
Password Generator (aka Pwgen) before 2.07 generates weak non-tty passwords, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to guess the password via a brute-force attack.

CVE-2013-4442
Published: 2014-12-19
Password Generator (aka Pwgen) before 2.07 uses weak pseudo generated numbers when /dev/urandom is unavailable, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to guess the numbers.

CVE-2013-7401
Published: 2014-12-19
The parse_request function in request.c in c-icap 0.2.x allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (crash) via a URI without a " " or "?" character in an ICAP request, as demonstrated by use of the OPTIONS method.

CVE-2014-2026
Published: 2014-12-19
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the search functionality in United Planet Intrexx Professional before 5.2 Online Update 0905 and 6.x before 6.0 Online Update 10 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the request parameter.

CVE-2014-2716
Published: 2014-12-19
Ekahau B4 staff badge tag 5.7 with firmware 1.4.52, Real-Time Location System (RTLS) Controller 6.0.5-FINAL, and Activator 3 reuses the RC4 cipher stream, which makes it easier for remote attackers to obtain plaintext messages via an XOR operation on two ciphertexts.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join us Wednesday, Dec. 17 at 1 p.m. Eastern Time to hear what employers are really looking for in a chief information security officer -- it may not be what you think.