Risk
12/13/2010
01:38 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Gawker Media Hacked

The company's user database and content management system have been breached, prompting calls to change passwords.

Gawker Media on Sunday said that its user database had been hacked and encouraged all registered users of the company's Web sites to change their passwords.

Gawker Media's properties include Gawker, Gizmodo, Jalopnik, Jezebel, Kotaku, Lifehacker, Deadspin, io9, and Fleshbot.

Over 1.3 million accounts, with some 540,000 associated e-mail addresses, were exposed and the company's content management system is said to have been compromised as well. The hacked data base file, initially available on The Pirate Bay's Web site, has since been removed. Gawker says that although the passwords were encrypted, they're still potentially vulnerable to hackers.

A group identifying itself as Gnosis has claimed responsibility for the attack. The group says its motivation is to punish Gawker for being arrogant, according to Mediaite.

Someone -- apparently H.D. Moore, creator of the metasploit framework and CSO at Rapid7, whose e-mail address is listed -- has posted a CSV file of the domains of affected e-mail addresses and hashed e-mail address values as a Google Fusion Table. The file includes instructions for how to generate an MD5 hash of one's e-mail address and to search for that value among the posted list of compromised accounts. Finding one's e-mail address on this list means it's definitely time to change your password.

Gawker is also advising users who maintained linked Twitter accounts with the same password to change their passwords at Twitter.

There's currently a Twitter spam campaign that's promoting acai berries through compromised accounts and there's some speculation that Twitter accounts exposed through the Gawker database compromise are being exploited to deliver the tweet spam.

Gawker Media issued an apology for the security failure. "We're deeply embarrassed by this breach," the company said in a statement on its Web site. "We should not be in the position of relying on the goodwill of the hackers who identified the weakness in our systems. And, yes, the irony is not lost on us."

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2011-4403
Published: 2015-04-24
Multiple cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerabilities in Zen Cart 1.3.9h allow remote attackers to hijack the authentication of administrators for requests that (1) delete a product via a delete_product_confirm action to product.php or (2) disable a product via a setflag action to categories.ph...

CVE-2012-2930
Published: 2015-04-24
Multiple cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerabilities in TinyWebGallery (TWG) before 1.8.8 allow remote attackers to hijack the authentication of administrators for requests that (1) add a user via an adduser action to admin/index.php or (2) conduct static PHP code injection attacks in .htusers...

CVE-2012-2932
Published: 2015-04-24
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in TinyWebGallery (TWG) before 1.8.8 allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the (1) selitems[] parameter in a copy, (2) chmod, or (3) arch action to admin/index.php or (4) searchitem parameter in a search action to admin/...

CVE-2012-5451
Published: 2015-04-24
Multiple stack-based buffer overflows in HttpUtils.dll in TVMOBiLi before 2.1.0.3974 allow remote attackers to cause a denial of service (tvMobiliService service crash) via a long string in a (1) GET or (2) HEAD request to TCP port 30888.

CVE-2015-0297
Published: 2015-04-24
Red Hat JBoss Operations Network 3.3.1 does not properly restrict access to certain APIs, which allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary Java methos via the (1) ServerInvokerServlet or (2) SchedulerService or (3) cause a denial of service (disk consumption) via the ContentManager.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join security and risk expert John Pironti and Dark Reading Editor-in-Chief Tim Wilson for a live online discussion of the sea-changing shift in security strategy and the many ways it is affecting IT and business.