Risk
3/11/2010
11:58 AM
50%
50%

Former TSA Worker Charged With Hacking

The Department of Justice indictment alleges that a former TSA employee tampered with servers containing data from the Terrorist Screening Database.

The Department of Justice has charged a Colorado man and former Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employee with trying to inject malicious code into TSA databases.

A federal jury indicted Douglas James Duchak, 46, of Colorado Springs, Colo., late Tuesday on two counts of intentionally attempting to damage a protected computer, according to a DoJ press release.

Duchak was an employee at the TSA's Colorado Springs Operations Center (CSOC) from August 2004 through Oct. 23, 2009. He worked as a data analyst in charge of updating TSA computers with information received from the federal government's Terrorist Screening Database and the U.S. Marshal's Service Warrant Information Network.

On. 22, 2009, seven days after he was told his employment would be terminated on Oct. 30, Duchak injected unauthorized code into the CSOC server containing data from the U.S. Marshal's Service Warrant Information Network, the DoJ alleges. That action comprises the first count of the indictment.

The next day he allegedly tried to load malicious code onto a server that contained the Terrorist Screening Database, the action comprising the second count.

If convicted, Duchak faces up to 10 years in federal prison, and a fine of up to $500,000 -- $250,000 per count.

Duchak surrendered to U.S. Marshals Wednesday morning and appeared in court in the U.S. District Court in Denver that afternoon. He pleaded not guilty and was released on a $25,000 bond, according to the court.

The TSA has been tightening the belt on security lately after TSA screeners failed to catch a man who attempted to blow up a U.S. flight from Amsterdam to Detroit on Christmas day.

The TSA Office of Inspection, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of the Inspector General, and the FBI investigated the case, which is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Patricia Davies.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
8 Key Building Blocks for Enterprise Network Defense
Networks are changing rapidly -- and so are strategies for protecting them. This Tech Digest looks at the fundamentals for the next-gen environment.
Flash Poll
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-7445
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

CVE-2015-4948
Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-5660
Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

CVE-2015-6003
Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

CVE-2015-6333
Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In this episode of Dark Reading Radio, veteran CISOs will share their experience and insight into how organizations can get the best bang for their security buck.