Risk
8/26/2008
06:37 PM
50%
50%

FAA Computer Glitch Causes National Flight Delays

The problems began when an Atlanta facility that processes flight plan information went down due to a software malfunction, FAA officials said.

An unknown software glitch caused hundreds of flight delays across the United States.

In a conference call with reporters, the FAA said the problems began when an Atlanta facility that processes flight plan information went down due to a software malfunction.

Once that facility went down, the information was sent to a backup facility in Salt Lake City. But the Utah facility was quickly overloaded as multiple airports re-filed their flight plans, leading to delays.

The failure did not lead to radar outages, or communication issues with in-flight planes, FAA spokesperson Kathleen Bergen said. The problem only affected planes that were waiting to take off.

The delays began shortly after 1 p.m. EST and airports in Chicago, Atlanta, Boston, and Washington D.C. were hardest hit.

The FAA's computer system is the National Air Space Data Interchange Network, or NADIN, and officials ruled out terrorism or hacking as the cause of the problem.

"It appears to be an internal software processing problem," said Hank Krakowski, CEO for the FAA's air traffic division, in a conference call. "We're going to have to do some forensics on it."

But Krakowski added that the failure in Atlanta was "unprecedented," and that the agency needs to analyze it to understand it. The NADIN software is expected to be upgraded by the end of the year, but officials did not say how it would improve the current system.

The FAA said it expects to have the problems solved by Tuesday night, and for now, the Salt Lake City facility is now process all of the nation's flight plan information.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
E-Commerce Security: What Every Enterprise Needs to Know
The mainstream use of EMV smartcards in the US has experts predicting an increase in online fraud. Organizations will need to look at new tools and processes for building better breach detection and response capabilities.
Flash Poll
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-7445
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

CVE-2015-4948
Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-5660
Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

CVE-2015-6003
Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

CVE-2015-6333
Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join Dark Reading community editor Marilyn Cohodas in a thought-provoking discussion about the evolving role of the CISO.