Risk
6/18/2007
10:41 PM
Sharon Gaudin
Sharon Gaudin
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Enterprise 2.0--Changing Corporate Culture Before Changing The Tech

At the Enterprise 2.0 conference in Boston this week I quickly caught on that this business/technology move isn't so much about the tech behind it but about harnessing what evangelists call the 'collective intelligence.' What they're getting at is that blogs and wikis aren't just cool and fun, they could help smart employees who are never heard find a corporate voice.

At the Enterprise 2.0 conference in Boston this week I quickly caught on that this business/technology move isn't so much about the tech behind it but about harnessing what evangelists call the 'collective intelligence.' What they're getting at is that blogs and wikis aren't just cool and fun, they could help smart employees who are never heard find a corporate voice.There was an interesting debate Monday morning between Andrew McAfee, an associate professor at Harvard Business School, and Tom Davenport, a professor at Babson College. While McAfee is credited with coining the term Enterprise 2.0, Davenport calls himself a "pragmatic killjoy" who doesn't think Enterprise 2.0 is revolutionary or even worthy of being given a new name.

The two men, who generally go at each other in the blogosphere, faced off at the conference, talking about whether technology might revolutionize the way businesses function in the future.

Then Willms Buhse, executive director of CoreMedia, a software company based in Germany, stood up and said that changing the corporate culture is more important than changing the technology. The cultural shift -- from the traditional hierarchy of follow-the-leader to an open exchange of ideas -- needs to come before even the coolest new technologies can make a real difference.

I talked with Buhse after the debate and he told me how they really shook up CoreMedia a few years back. They got rid of company departments. Gone was marketing, sales, finance. They spent some time creating a team of leaders for the company and then they gave their employees a voice by first using wikis and then allowing them to blog on an internal network. By this fall, Buhse said they hope to open up the blogs to a network of partners and then, maybe even this year, they hope to open it up to the general public.

"For us, the organization was the important thing," he said. "It's about the corporate culture."

But what about the inevitable moment when an employee starts talking about something embarrassing to the company or relays sensitive corporate information? How open will they feel then?

Buhse said he's just not worried about it.

"If something is going to be said, the discussion is ongoing anyway," he explained. "Currently, I'm very happy to have the discussion companywide. It would happen in the sales kitchen anyway… I would rather have a negative comment on my Web site, rather than people talking about it without us knowing it."

At this point, out of 150 employees, Buhse said at least 30% are blogging and he suspects that 80% are reading them. Now they're working on a new interface that will combine e-mail, wikis, and blogs, making it easier for mobile workers to submit blog feedback from their smartphones and handhelds.

It's an interesting approach to running a business and to opening up communication lines.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Partner Perspectives
What's This?
In a digital world inundated with advanced security threats, Intel Security seeks to transform how we live and work to keep our information secure. Through hardware and software development, Intel Security delivers robust solutions that integrate security into every layer of every digital device. In combining the security expertise of McAfee with the innovation, performance, and trust of Intel, this vision becomes a reality.

As we rely on technology to enhance our everyday and business life, we must too consider the security of the intellectual property and confidential data that is housed on these devices. As we increase the number of devices we use, we increase the number of gateways and opportunity for security threats. Intel Security takes the “security connected” approach to ensure that every device is secure, and that all security solutions are seamlessly integrated.
Featured Writers
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading's October Tech Digest
Fast data analysis can stymie attacks and strengthen enterprise security. Does your team have the data smarts?
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2012-5242
Published: 2014-10-21
Directory traversal vulnerability in functions/suggest.php in Banana Dance B.2.6 and earlier allows remote attackers to include and execute arbitrary local files via a .. (dot dot) in the name parameter in a get_template action.

CVE-2012-5243
Published: 2014-10-21
functions/suggest.php in Banana Dance B.2.6 and earlier allows remote attackers to read arbitrary database information via a crafted request.

CVE-2012-5702
Published: 2014-10-21
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in dotProject before 2.1.7 allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the (1) callback parameter in a color_selector action, (2) field parameter in a date_format action, or (3) company_name parameter in an addedit action to i...

CVE-2013-7406
Published: 2014-10-21
SQL injection vulnerability in the MRBS module for Drupal allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary SQL commands via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2014-2531
Published: 2014-10-21
SQL injection vulnerability in xhr.php in InterWorx Web Control Panel (aka InterWorx Hosting Control Panel and InterWorx-CP) before 5.0.14 build 577 allows remote authenticated users to execute arbitrary SQL commands via the i parameter in a search action to the (1) NodeWorx , (2) SiteWorx, or (3) R...

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Follow Dark Reading editors into the field as they talk with noted experts from the security world.