Risk
10/30/2008
09:26 PM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Cyber Attacks Targeting UK National Infrastructure

A key U.K. IT security defense leader says that continuous cyberattacks are targeting U.K. businesses that work in the nation's critical infrastructure.

A key U.K. IT security defense leader says that continuous cyberattacks are targeting U.K. businesses that work in the nation's critical infrastructure.The businesses being attacked include financial services and utility companies, according to this Silicon.com story by reporter Nick Heath:

That was the warning from Mark Oram, head of the threat and infosec knowledge department at the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) -- the security service tasked with protecting key government and private organisations in the UK. Speaking at the RSA Conference 2008 in London he said: "We see frequent attacks on organisations for the purpose of theft of property.

The story goes on to detail some steps the European Union needs to take to bolster its defenses:

The report from the European Network and Information Security Agency recommends prompt reaction on reported incidents, collaboration between public and private stakeholders and development of a national strategy for information sharing and responsibilities for different parts of the network.

There's little doubt that criminal hackers are aiming at prime targets, such as financial services, manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies, and businesses working in the national infrastructure, including defense contractors and utilities. Most of these attacks are probably financially motivated -- stealing trade secrets -- rather than terrorism.

But in my opinion, it's not important to know the motivation of the attackers as much as it is to focus on shoring up vulnerabilities. Whether hacking for the joy, or attacking for financial gain -- the same techniques and vulnerabilities are used. There are no special terrorist or corporate espionage toolkits.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading Must Reads - September 25, 2014
Dark Reading's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of identity and access management. Learn about access control in the age of HTML5, how to improve authentication, why Active Directory is dead, and more.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2012-5619
Published: 2014-09-29
The Sleuth Kit (TSK) 4.0.1 does not properly handle "." (dotfile) file system entries in FAT file systems and other file systems for which . is not a reserved name, which allows local users to hide activities it more difficult to conduct forensics activities, as demonstrated by Flame.

CVE-2012-5621
Published: 2014-09-29
lib/engine/components/opal/opal-call.cpp in ekiga before 4.0.0 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (crash) via an OPAL connection with a party name that contains invalid UTF-8 strings.

CVE-2012-6107
Published: 2014-09-29
Apache Axis2/C does not verify that the server hostname matches a domain name in the subject's Common Name (CN) or subjectAltName field of the X.509 certificate, which allows man-in-the-middle attackers to spoof SSL servers via an arbitrary valid certificate.

CVE-2012-6110
Published: 2014-09-29
bcron-exec in bcron before 0.10 does not close file descriptors associated with temporary files when running a cron job, which allows local users to modify job files and send spam messages by accessing an open file descriptor.

CVE-2013-1874
Published: 2014-09-29
Untrusted search path vulnerability in csi in Chicken before 4.8.2 allows local users to execute arbitrary code via a Trojan horse .csirc in the current working directory.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In our next Dark Reading Radio broadcast, we’ll take a close look at some of the latest research and practices in application security.