Risk
1/21/2009
04:14 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

70 Of Top 100 Web Sites Spread Malware

Advice to visit only legitimate Web sites appears to be meaningless as increasing numbers of mainstream sites contain known malicious code.

Internet users are often encouraged to visit only legitimate Web sites to reduce the risk of malware infections, but distinguishing between legitimate and illegitimate Web sites increasingly appears to be meaningless.

Seventy percent of the top 100 Web sites either hosted malicious content or contained a link designed to redirect site visitors to a malicious Web site during the second half of 2008, claims Websense's report State of Internet Security, Q3-Q4, 2008.

That represents a 16% increase over the first half of 2008.

Perhaps more to the point, Websense says that 77% of Web sites with known malicious code are "legitimate" sites, calling into question the utility of any such designation of approval.

There are a variety of ways that brand-name sites can be compromised, including online iFrame injection services that rely on stolen logon information or SQL injection attacks.

Spam messages with malicious links can also lead to site compromises. According to Websense's report, almost 85% of e-mail messages were spam during the second half of 2008, and more than 90% of spam messages contained links to spam sites or malicious sites.

Only 6% of spam messages were phishing attempts, a 33% decrease from the first six months of 2008. Malware authors appear to be focusing more on data-stealing Trojans and DNS poisoning to accomplish their goals.

Porn-related spam surged 94% during the latter half of last year, a marketing gambit that appears to be consistent with porn industry poor-mouthing -- earlier this month, porn moguls made a show of stated plans to ask the U.S. government for a $5 billion financial bailout to shore up sagging sales. Porn spam, however, only represents 9% of the spam out there.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Flash Poll
Current Issue
Cartoon
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-0103
Published: 2014-07-29
WebAccess in Zarafa before 7.1.10 and WebApp before 1.6 stores credentials in cleartext, which allows local Apache users to obtain sensitive information by reading the PHP session files.

CVE-2014-0475
Published: 2014-07-29
Multiple directory traversal vulnerabilities in GNU C Library (aka glibc or libc6) before 2.20 allow context-dependent attackers to bypass ForceCommand restrictions and possibly have other unspecified impact via a .. (dot dot) in a (1) LC_*, (2) LANG, or other locale environment variable.

CVE-2014-0889
Published: 2014-07-29
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in IBM Atlas Suite (aka Atlas Policy Suite), as used in Atlas eDiscovery Process Management through 6.0.3, Disposal and Governance Management for IT through 6.0.3, and Global Retention Policy and Schedule Management through 6.0.3, allow remote atta...

CVE-2014-2226
Published: 2014-07-29
Ubiquiti UniFi Controller before 3.2.1 logs the administrative password hash in syslog messages, which allows man-in-the-middle attackers to obtains sensitive information via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2014-3020
Published: 2014-07-29
install.sh in the Embedded WebSphere Application Server (eWAS) 7.0 before FP33 in IBM Tivoli Integrated Portal (TIP) 2.1 and 2.2 sets world-writable permissions for the installRoot directory tree, which allows local users to gain privileges via a Trojan horse program.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio