Risk

1/11/2011
11:24 AM
50%
50%

57% Of SMBs Have No Disaster Recovery Plan

Symantec study finds that one in four of the small and midsize businesses surveyed don't view computer systems as critical to business.

One in two small and midsize businesses (SMBs) have no recovery plan in the event of a network outage, data loss, or other IT disaster, according to a study released Tuesday by Symantec.

That represents an increase from a similar study Symantec conducted a year ago, when 47% had no program in place. Small businesses -- defined in the report as firms with between 5 and 99 workers -- may be at particular risk: 57% have no disaster recovery plan. 47% of midsize companies with between 100 and 1,000 employees didn't have a recovery process in place.

"Obviously, at a high level, SMBs are still not prepared for disaster," said Bernard Laroche, senior director of SMB product marketing. "From our standpoint, it's not good news."

Of the firms without a disaster recovery plan, 41% said it had never occurred to them. 36% said they intend to implement one within the next six months. More than half (52%) said they don't think computer systems are critical to business -- that translates roughly to one in four of all of the businesses polled.

"This is probably the most shocking revelation of the survey," Laroche said. "That's pretty alarming."

Symantec's 2011 SMB Disaster Preparedness Survey included 1,288 businesses worldwide with between 5 and 1,000 employees -- as well as 552 customers of those companies -- across a broad range of industries. A "disaster" could be anything that causes an outage or data loss, whether natural or human-made. The new findings arrive in spite of a different Symantec report, published in June, that showed SMBs are increasingly fearful of online threats and data loss.

The businesses polled experienced on average six outages during 2010, with the top reasons given including cyberattacks, power failures, and natural disasters.

Those outages are expensive, according to Symantec's data, to the tune of $12,500 vaporized from the business' bottom line per day of downtime. Customers of SMBs also feel the pain: Outages at their SMB vendors cost them $10,000 per day, and 44% said they have had a smaller vendor temporarily shut down because of a technology failure. 29% of the customers in the study said they have lost "some" or "a lot of" data owing to a vendor's disaster.

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
'PowerSnitch' Hacks Androids via Power Banks
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  12/8/2018
The Case for a Human Security Officer
Ira Winkler, CISSP, President, Secure Mentem,  12/5/2018
Windows 10 Security Questions Prove Easy for Attackers to Exploit
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  12/5/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
10 Best Practices That Could Reshape Your IT Security Department
This Dark Reading Tech Digest, explores ten best practices that could reshape IT security departments.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-8651
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-12
A cross site scripting vulnerability exists when Microsoft Dynamics NAV does not properly sanitize a specially crafted web request to an affected Dynamics NAV server, aka "Microsoft Dynamics NAV Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability." This affects Microsoft Dynamics NAV.
CVE-2018-8652
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-12
A Cross-site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability exists when Windows Azure Pack does not properly sanitize user-provided input, aka "Windows Azure Pack Cross Site Scripting Vulnerability." This affects Windows Azure Pack Rollup 13.1.
CVE-2018-8617
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-12
A remote code execution vulnerability exists in the way that the Chakra scripting engine handles objects in memory in Microsoft Edge, aka "Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability." This affects Microsoft Edge, ChakraCore. This CVE ID is unique from CVE-2018-8583, CVE-2018-8...
CVE-2018-8618
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-12
A remote code execution vulnerability exists in the way that the Chakra scripting engine handles objects in memory in Microsoft Edge, aka "Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability." This affects Microsoft Edge, ChakraCore. This CVE ID is unique from CVE-2018-8583, CVE-2018-8...
CVE-2018-8619
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-12
A remote code execution vulnerability exists when the Internet Explorer VBScript execution policy does not properly restrict VBScript under specific conditions, aka "Internet Explorer Remote Code Execution Vulnerability." This affects Internet Explorer 9, Internet Explorer 11, Internet Exp...