Endpoint // Privacy

Richard Clarke: Snowden Should Be in Prison

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Former White House cybersecurity advisor Richard Clarke says that although the NSA's domestic intelligence data collection has been too broad, there is no evidence that NSA has yet used this data for ill and that Edward Snowden has jeopardized the United States' national security.

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ChrisR486
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ChrisR486,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/25/2015 | 11:51:31 PM
Re: Many interpretations
That's easy to say when you have no responsibility to protect 300 million people. So please don't speak for me, come work for an agency and see what the real world is like. I think u might change your mind
ChrisR486
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ChrisR486,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/25/2015 | 11:48:25 PM
Re: So punishment is only for low level operators
It's funny ...you people talk so much crap about how this country is run... But why don't you live in Russia ? Why does Snowden want to come home ? I tell you why ... Because you like it here. You like your Starbucks , your Walmart , your nicely paved roads , access to free porn ...all the while talk crap about things you know nothing about. Trust me , the NSA and the president does more to protect you and your family in one afternoon then you will ever protect this country in your whole life. Go to china or Russia and steal classified material from one of their agencies ... See what happens to you and your family. Snowden is lucky the US govt has restraint.
rjones2818
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rjones2818,
User Rank: Strategist
3/31/2014 | 2:06:51 PM
Re: Snowden: Hero or Traitor?
"...in a totatarian state like Russia."

 

You really shouldn't be writing about a situation if you have so little idea about what's going on.  Russia's no more totalitarian than we are at this point.  Actually, come to think of it....
FairSec
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FairSec,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 12:23:58 PM
So punishment is only for low level operators
If Snowden belongs in prison, he should share a cell with Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. Clapper perjured himself in front of Congress when in response to Senator Wyden asking: "Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?" Clapper responded, "No, sir." Wyden asked "It does not?" and Clapper said "Not wittingly. There are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly."]

By any reasonable standard Clapper committed perjury, which is a felony punishable by jail time.

But no one less than Pres. Obama (and many others in positions of power) excused his perjured testimony as being justifyable given the alternative was to potentially divulge sensitive information.

So every day people from Snowden to Clapper must make value decisions on what is in the national interest.  Personally I think that Snowden made the right call, and as a US citizen has just as much right to make a personal call as Clapper. Personally, I'm glad there are people like Snowden who put their own safety and freedom at risk when there are people like Clapper who find lying to the people's lawfully elected representatives acceptable.

Personally, (although I doubt I'd have the guts that Snowden displayed) when faced with officials blindly lying to Congress made the decision that the national interest was best served by a truthful telling to the American people of what was really going on.

To me it is totally disingenuous for Pres. Obama to state that the national interest was served by an open discussion of what information on US citizens the intelligence community should be allowed to collect and then in the same breath to effectively state that anyone who divulges that information should be prosecuted when the President effectively says it's okay to lie to Congress when officials in the know lie about the truth.
longshadow
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longshadow,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 10:57:30 AM
Whistleblowing doesn't work
I should note that I now a couple of (ex) government employee's who usedthe internal whistleblower processes to report wrong doing.  Every one of them was quietly drummed out fo their efforts.  They sytem doesn't protect whistleblowers -at all. 

 

Who wants to sacrifice the rest of their life for a bunch of people that don't generally care?  Get the information out but do it in a way that protects yourslf and your family. 
longshadow
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longshadow,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 10:49:50 AM
Not Just Snowden
Don't buy the spin.  Snowden should only go to jail if all of the corrupt and selv serving criminals that he xposed also go to jail.  Jail isn't just for the middle and lower classes..
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
3/30/2014 | 2:53:53 PM
Re: Snowden: Hero or Traitor?
Personally I share the Marylin's opinion. I also think is better knowing uncomfortable truth revealed by Snowden.

Ironically he landed in Russia, and situation in Crimea demonstrates that that the Russian policy is in contrast with the Snowden's thought.

 
RonnyB950
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RonnyB950,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/29/2014 | 10:37:28 AM
Re: ...agree
Actually, we are allowed , and do have the right to break laws. The law is not an absolute, they are changable, and we can break them for the right reason. That is part of what freedom is about, the right to choose what you do. Most of the time we would be punished for it and rightly so, but, in some circumstances it is found that breaking a law was more right than obeying it or the law itself was totally wrong, unenforceable, racist Etc.

Sometimes it is recognised that when a law was broken that there was no need for punishment, and sometimes those decisions are right, sometimes not. Many people n government have escaped punishment, some rightly and some wrongly.

The law is the law, but it is not an absolute.
RonnyB950
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RonnyB950,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/29/2014 | 10:25:07 AM
Re: Snowden: Hero or Traitor?
Landing in Russia may be ironic, but, he did not have much of a choice, so it's not really a good point to make.
RonnyB950
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RonnyB950,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/29/2014 | 10:21:03 AM
Many interpretations
Some say he should have followed the procedures set out for "whistleblowers", but, I think it's fair to say those avenues are not really adequate or safe. So, under such circumstances, where one feels the need to correct or expose a perceived wrong doing, but feels the system will react like some kind of venus fly trap, what should you do, take the risk and maybe become a disappeared person ( Etc.) Do nothing and pretend nothing is wrong, or do what Snowden did ( obviously C.Mannings way was a disaster for him).

Sure, the law is the law, but we all know that there are good reasons to break laws, and sometimes breaking the law is the most ethical and moral thing to do, and in fact needs to be done. Governments make laws, some are good and right, but not all, and some are made to protect governments from being found out, these laws are abuses of power.

Snowden revealed what needed to be revealed, without him the government would have gotten more and more out of control. All the things we fought and died for for the last couple of hundred years would have gone out the window, what is the use of having words such as freedom, privacy, pursuit of happiness Etc Etc. if they are just words, just a belief but not a reality, no amount of security is worth such a loss.


Sure, we probably lost some advantages in "intelligence" but that loss just may prevent the loss of things that are much harder to get back, and if we lose those things, then our enemies have won, those enemies cannot defeat us with a thousand 9/11s, but if we lose our liberty, our right to privacy, our way of life, then we lose everything.


 
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