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Qubitekk to Present New Keyless Authentication Method Using Quantum Cryptography at IQC/ETSI Workshop

SAN DIEGO (October 3, 2014) -- San Diego startup Qubitekk (qubitekk.com) will present its quantum cryptography system for keyless authentication of machine-to-machine communications during the IQC/ETSI Quantum-Safe Crypto Workshop, to be held October 6-7 at the Fairmont Chateau Laurier in Ottawa, Canada. Dr. Duncan Earl, founder and CTO, will present Qubitekk’s system at Session 5 on October 7 at 10 AM.

Dr. Earl will discuss how Qubitekk’s unique solution represents an important improvement over traditional Quantum Key Distributions (QKD) systems that offer security over fiber-only channels. Qubitekk’s new authentication method is not susceptible to a quantum computer attack since it avoids reliance on secret keys or mathematical algorithms.

This workshop will bring together the diverse communities that will need to co-operate to standardize and deploy the next-generation cryptographic infrastructure, in particular, one that will be secure against emerging quantum computing technologies.

 "We’re looking forward to exploring our vision of quantum cryptography with the diverse communities attending the workshop,“ said Dr. Earl.  “Currently, no solution exists for securing communications in a post-quantum computer world.  We welcome the opportunity to demonstrate how Qubitekk’s solution is future-proof and will help guarantee the integrity of wired and wireless communications. “

Under a federal program Qubitekk is working in partnership with national laboratories, universities and major utilities to prepare for threats to critical infrastructure in the 21st century and beyond.

Qubitekk's goal is to fortify the U.S. power grid, which currently consists of about 30 million networked devices (power stations, transformers, reclosers, etc.), all of which use public key encryption. With the adoption of Smart Meters, that number is expected to reach 300 million by 2020. Each device is a potential entry point for malicious hackers.

This year, Qubitekk also announced the availability of the world’s first plug-and-play entangled photon generator, the QES1. Like the transistors at the hearts of classical computers, the QES1 enables the flow of information through quantum computers and quantum encryption products.

About Qubitekk, Inc.

San Diego-based Qubitekk, formerly known as GridCOM Technologies, is a private company founded in 2012 to commercialize the core technology required to speed the adoption of quantum computing and cryptography technologies and applications. Dr. Duncan Earl, founder and CTO, is one of the leading developers of quantum entanglement solutions, having served nearly 20 years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), most recently with the Cyberspace Sciences and Information Intelligence Research group. Learn more at www.qubitekk.com. Qubitekk's Quantum Data Locking technology was named as one of Popular Science magazine's 20 Ideas that will Change the World," in January 2014 under the company's former name, GridCOM Technologies. Since 2012 Qubitekk has raised more than $2 million in working capital.

About Dr. Duncan Earl

Dr. Duncan Earl is a visionary in developing optical technologies for both private businesses and government organizations. Prior to Qubitekk, he researched advanced technologies for national security applications at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).  One of his focal points was quantum encryption solutions for the emerging smart grid. Dr. Earl was named one of Smart Grid Today's “50 Pioneers of 2013” for his work developing quantum encryption technology to protect critical infrastructure. Dr. Earl holds a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, an M.S. in Physics and a B.S. in Engineering Physics from the University of Tennessee.

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