Operations

8/11/2015
02:00 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail vvv
50%
50%

How To Empower Women In Security

First-ever Black Hat USA women in security panel debuted last week--and now will be an annual event.

What not to ask a woman in the security field, where men make up 90% of the workforce: What's it like to be a woman in the security field?

Women information security professionals want to be equally respected and credited for the work they're doing to advance security. But that also means they must advocate for themselves and their work when no one else will, and even engage in a little self-promotion, something that doesn't come easy for many of us.

That was just one of the takeaways from the first-ever Black Hat USA luncheon and panel on women in IT security last week, Beyond the Gender Gap: Empowering Women in Security. I had the honor of moderating this panel of some of the industry's most accomplished women -- Justine Bone, independent consultant and a former CISO; Joyce Brocaglia, founder of the Executive Women’s Forum and CEO of Alta Associates; Jennifer Imhoff-Dousharm, co-founder, dc408 and Vegas 2.0 hacker groups; and Katie Moussouris, Chief Policy Officer at HackerOne.

The panel was not about complaining or lamenting the low numbers of women in security. These are women who got over being the only women in the room a long time ago. They very candidly shared their personal and sometimes painful journeys, their war stories, their successes, and their advice to other women in the industry, or for women looking to enter the field.

Bone says she learned a tough lesson about keeping a low profile during the years when she was heads-down helping start up and run Immunity Inc. Some people outside the company assumed she had been on maternity leave during that period, and she realized she should have been bringing her work to the attention of the security community. That cost her the outside recognition she could have earned for her work and accomplishments.

"Don't ask. Tell," Imhoff-Dousharm advises women in the field. It's all about confidence and not shying away from taking the initiative, Brocaglia and the other panelists agreed.

Men are part of the equation, too:  they can serve as advocates and mentors for women in security, the panelists said, and should stand up for women when they witness sexual harassment or other discrimination at work or at conferences and social events.  

As Moussouris says, the focus should be about her work, not her "plumbing."

Looking for further resources on empowering women in security? Check out the Executive Women's Forum (EWF) -- Brocaglia's brainchild -- and the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT). In addition, here are some NCWIT resources:

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
FlashB
100%
0%
FlashB,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/11/2015 | 3:21:13 PM
Thanks Black Hat!
It's wonderful that BH is making an effort to promote women in Infosec. I didn't get to attend the luncheon mentioned in this article because I was busy selling raffle tickets for BH prizes at Black Hat's new charity booth. BH chose Girl Develop It as the first beneficiary of this raffle. GDI raised over $1100 to continue developing training for women in the IT field including Information Security. BH donated every dime from the raffle to the cause and also fully donated the awesome gift basket and black card. I can't thank BH enough and all of the attendees of BH for contributing so much. I'd say everyone did a great job of showing support for women in Infosec. And I had the best seat in the house representing GDI and getting to meet and talk to hundreds of Infosec professionals at the best Security conference around. 

Looking forward to next year! 

Pam Armstrong
Girl Develop It - Phoenix
Why CISOs Need a Security Reality Check
Joel Fulton, Chief Information Security Officer for Splunk,  6/13/2018
Cisco Talos Summit: Network Defenders Not Serious Enough About Attacks
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  6/13/2018
Meet 'Bro': The Best-Kept Secret of Network Security
Greg Bell, CEO, Corelight,  6/14/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
The State of IT and Cybersecurity
The State of IT and Cybersecurity
IT and security are often viewed as different disciplines - and different departments. Find out what our survey data revealed, read the report today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-12294
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-19
WebCore/platform/graphics/texmap/TextureMapperLayer.cpp in WebKit, as used in WebKitGTK+ prior to version 2.20.2, is vulnerable to a use after free for a WebCore::TextureMapperLayer object.
CVE-2018-12519
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-19
An issue was discovered in ShopNx through 2017-11-17. The vulnerability allows a remote attacker to upload any malicious file to a Node.js application. An attacker can upload a malicious HTML file that contains a JavaScript payload to steal a user's credentials.
CVE-2018-12588
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-19
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in templates/frontend/pages/searchResults.tpl in Public Knowledge Project (PKP) Open Monograph Press (OMP) v1.2.0 through 3.1.1-1 before 3.1.1-2 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the catalog.noTitlesSearch parameter (aka the S...
CVE-2018-10811
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-19
strongSwan 5.6.0 and older allows Remote Denial of Service because of Missing Initialization of a Variable.
CVE-2018-10945
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-19
The mg_handle_cgi function in mongoose.c in Mongoose 6.11 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (heap-based buffer over-read and application crash, or NULL pointer dereference) via an HTTP request, related to the mbuf_insert function.