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11/10/2016
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How To Build A Comprehensive Security Architecture

Dark Reading's virtual event features a panel discussion on what it takes to get away from the daily firefighting method of responding to threats and attacks.

Let's face it: security technologies and products traditionally have been fairly reactive creations that ultimately end up out of date once a new threat emerges that they can't detect or mitigate. That's left many enterprises throwing in one-off security tools to fill the gaps, and no streamlined or unified way to track and act on attacks or attack attempts.

Organizations today are mostly stuck in firefighting mode.  

The ideal, of course, is to have a more comprehensive and streamlined set of security tools, practices, and processes that ultimately reflects a coordinated and more extensive security strategy.

The good news is that it's actually doable. SANS Internet Storm Center's Johannes B. Ullrich, dean of research at the SANS Technology Institute; Chenxi Wang, chief strategy officer of Twistlock; Jeff Schilling, chief of operations and security at Armor; and Joel Cardella, senior program developer for strategic services at Rapid7, all will tackle this topic during a panel discussion I'll be moderating on Nov. 15 during Dark Reading's virtual event, Rethinking Your Enterprise IT Security Strategy.

We'll look at just what a comprehensive security architecture should encompass, where you can get the right tools/products, what it costs, and what to do with existing tools it may replace (or not). How to avoid falling into the single-vendor trap, and what the cloud's role here plays, also will be on our agenda, as well as the organizational steps necessary.

Hopefully, that's enough to whet your appetite to join us on Nov. 15 at 2:45pm-3:30pm ET, for the "How To Build And Maintain A Comprehensive Enterprise Security Architecture" panel. It's free to register, and you can chat online with the panelists right after. Here's how:

Dark Reading's all-day virtual event Nov. 15 offers an in-depth look at myths surrounding data defense and how to put business on a more effective security path. 

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio
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macker490
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macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
11/11/2016 | 8:32:10 AM
Two Keys to Cybersecurity
1. Ball point pen -- or ?

We used to authenticate documents with our signature on paper, generally using  ball point pen

what method do we use on digital documents?

there won't be any progress until we generally adopt digital signatures.   these are necessary to provide for verification of identity on digital documents -- such as -- e/mails,   forms 1040,   etc

we have traditional services that verify identities: banks, credit unions, DMV offices, Notary/Public, ---

we need to have these serivces offer also verification of PGP signatures and x.509 certificates.

 

2. secure operating software

we must insist on secure operating software.    a secure o/s is one which will not permit itself to be updated with un-authorized programming -- and which protects its applications and data from un-authorized access.

 

the path is clear and marked but it is mainly an economic and administrative problem: the technology is available.   not perfect -- but -- we have much better options available to us and we can continue to improves on these.

 
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