Operations

11/26/2014
10:00 AM
John Klossner
John Klossner
Cartoon Contest
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Cartoon: The Insider Threat

John Klossner has been drawing technology cartoons for more than 15 years. His work regularly appears in Computerworld and Federal Computer Week. His illustrations and cartoons have also been published in The New Yorker, Barron's, and The Wall Street Journal. Web site: ... View Full Bio

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saipraneeth
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saipraneeth,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/17/2015 | 6:58:46 AM
Re: Social engineering the office party..
nice post
GonzSTL
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GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
12/16/2014 | 11:45:06 AM
Re: It's a small world
That was undoubtedly awkward for both of you. IT communities within a city are typically small and closely knit. I attend several tech conferences every year and I see the same people time and again, albeit sometimes with different companies. Unfortunately, non-IT executives rarely venture into those gatherings and it is difficult for them to network with IT professionals, so they sometimes have to rely on paper qualifications. I know some IT folks who look very good on paper, but somewhat lacking in actual experience. Things have a way of sorting themselves out though, especially in a highly technical field such as IT.
aws0513
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aws0513,
User Rank: Ninja
12/16/2014 | 11:33:59 AM
Re: It's a small world
The situation was somewhat less than seredipitous.
From what I learned later, the guy omitted or "embellished" certain details about his work history.
Definitely an awkward situation for my friend.  He was desparate for a security professional leader for the executive team, but found out after the fact that he had possibly hired a lemon.

I told my friend that it was not uncommon for paths to cross in the security industry.  Good security professionals understand and commonly engage the power of human networking and knowledge sharing.
GonzSTL
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GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
12/16/2014 | 10:57:53 AM
Re: It's a small world
Reminds me of that long standing joke about government employees - if you do good work, you are considered invaluable in that position and simply stagnate; but if you screw up, you are removed from the position and then get promoted!
aws0513
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aws0513,
User Rank: Ninja
12/15/2014 | 4:00:01 PM
It's a small world
Awhile back, I was attending a small scale IT security symposium.
The first part of the event was a short social time where everyone had bagels and coffee before the first presentation. 

It was shortly into that social time when I ran into a good friend who happened to be an executive for another company in the city where this conference was located.  He wanted to introduce me to his new CISO and sent his administrative assistant to fetch him from somewhere on the other side of the crowded room.

A few moments later, the assistant came back somewhat upset. She mentioned the CISO had to leave in a rush due to some kind of emergency.  My friend was visibly concerned and hoped that we could link up again in the future.  He then told me the name of this new CISO and if I had heard of him before.

When he told me the name of this new CISO, I first had to verify what the guy looked like and finalized that by mentioning the name of this new CISOs wife.  My friend was amazed I knew the guy and asked where we had crossed paths.

Then I proceeded to inform my friend how approximately a year prior I was involved in getting his new CISO released (fired) from a network manager position at another organization we both happened to work for.  The reasons for which I was not at liberty to disclose.

Awkward...
Soozy G. Miller
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Soozy G. Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/15/2014 | 1:18:01 PM
for a day
Maybe if it could be stolen for a day and I could be someone else for just that day, it would be cool. Like Madonna. Or Kate Middleton. Or Gwen Stefani. Would I get Gwen's voice along with her identity?
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/4/2014 | 12:20:46 AM
Re: Who's stealing from whom?
@ODA155: haha, you flatter me.

Okay, someone with more money, then.  :p
ODA155
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ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
12/3/2014 | 5:28:38 PM
Re: Who's stealing from whom?
@Joe Stanganelli,... Someone "cooler" than you... dude, how is that even possible?
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/3/2014 | 10:57:48 AM
Re: Who's stealing from whom?
LOL, Joe. If only it was that simple..
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/3/2014 | 1:12:56 AM
Who's stealing from whom?
Sometimes I worry about having my identity stolen.

Then I think that if that ever happened, I could seize the opportunity to take on the identity of someone cooler.
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