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9 Years Prison, $1.7 Million Fine For Malicious Insider

Former IT engineer stung for destructive attack on law firm.

A former IT engineer for a Dallas law firm was sentenced to 115 months in prison and ordered to pay $1.697 million in restitution for a destructive computer attack he committed against his former employer in 2011. The sentencing comes in the wake of a flurry of attacks on law firms and the highly publicized leak at Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca.  

Anastasio N. Laoutaris, 41, of Spring, Texas, was an IT engineer for Locke Lord LLP from 2006 to August 2011. On Dec.1 and Dec. 5, 2011, four months after his employment there ended, Laoutaris accessed Locke Lord's systems without authorization and according to court documents, issued commands that caused "significant damage" to the network, "including deleting or disabling hundreds of user accounts, desktop and laptop accounts, and user e-mail accounts."

Laoutaris was convicted of two counts of intentionally accessing a computer network without authorization and intentionally issuing commands and codes that caused damage to the network.

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Sara Peters is Senior Editor at Dark Reading and formerly the editor-in-chief of Enterprise Efficiency. Prior that she was senior editor for the Computer Security Institute, writing and speaking about virtualization, identity management, cybersecurity law, and a myriad ... View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/21/2016 | 7:55:19 PM
Employee revenge
This is one of the differences between outside attackers and inside attackers.  When people ask which is the greater threat, it really depends upon the context and the motive.  Hell hath little fury like an employee or ex-employee scorned.
User Rank: Ninja
4/19/2016 | 7:48:57 AM
Only time
Instances like this are the only time I think hackers' names should be mentioned. If they're tried and convicted it's fine, but in the case of the alleged, or criminals that aren't apprehended, I'd like to see them remain unnamed so as to avoid giving them the publicity they are usually after.
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2016 | 6:56:53 AM
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