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2/24/2016
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FBI Vs. Apple: Privacy Syllabus

Some of the very best articles, blogs, and other opinions on the issue of government meddling in encryption technology.
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Looking to get caught up on the latest security industry sentiment on the battle between the FBI and Apple over iOS encryption? Dark Reading has simplified the process for you. We've pored through the hornet's nest of public opinion on the issue and cherry-picked some of the very best op-eds and media interviews in this handy reading list. We've also provided a few important source documents for those trying to get more than a surface level understanding of the issues.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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Luongo
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Luongo,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2016 | 2:39:37 AM
Re: There is a way out
nice great
Grands-mamans
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Grands-mamans,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/9/2016 | 2:35:01 AM
Re: There is a way out
The FBI have probably already cracked it :(
wedgetail
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wedgetail,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/1/2016 | 12:06:54 PM
Re: Apple vs FBI
The FBI have probably already cracked it.  If not, then they are not utilizing their available resources very well.

Apple know that their encryption is not infallible, however they must defend their position otherwise the public will lose faith, purely a marketing decision.

Cracking any encryption takes too much time and every time the FBI attempt to crack an iPhone, they start at zero, even if they have a preferred method.  If the FBI identify a faster way to penetrate iPhones then of course they will try to get it, and set legal precedent along the way.
KeithM986
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KeithM986,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/1/2016 | 11:56:58 AM
I guess I am in the minority in being unclear how your phone becomes so protected...
So if you commit a crime, the police/FBI, with a warrent, are allowed to search your house and/or buisness, get access to your accounts and computer, they can impound your car, check phone records, get access to safes or anything else that you might have. They even might get access to search friends and neighbors to an extent, but god forbid they have access to your phone...that is sacred.

 

Clearly your phone, as well as the rest of your privacy, needs to be protected...so no unwarrented search and seizure...of anything, but if you are suspected of a crime...suspected enough that a specific warrent is made out for your arrest, then I don't see how your phone suddenly becomes civil rights hollowed ground.

 

Now if this is the case that Apple simply cannot do it from a tech stand point (cause really, if they are saying they can load an OS that allows the phone to be brute forced that means anyone could do that) then that is something else...
cyberpink
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cyberpink,
User Rank: Strategist
3/1/2016 | 10:45:41 AM
Re: David against Goliath ?
I share your concern for the common good of our country.  Privacy is not the real issue at stake.  But it is being used to sideline the public.  Safety and security of the American public is at stake.  The question I ask, "Is there ever a situation where the safety of America trumps the privacy of a cell phone?"  Does a 9/11 event ever rank as important enough?  Or a Pearl Harbor attack?  It is obvious that cell phones and the internet are used to coordinate attacks - their primary purpose is to communicate no matter where your location is.  Everyone involved wants the privacy of America preserved.  But at what cost?
audrey-privateblog
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audrey-privateblog,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2016 | 4:31:54 AM
David against Goliath ?

I don't know what will happen with this "Apple vs government story", but i think it won't be very good for users...  as ever :(

Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2016 | 5:00:00 PM
The information in iPhone
Another point I would like to make, there should not be any information in iPhone that is not somewhere else. The only think that can be in iPhone are the pictures most likely, there rest is always somewhere else too.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2016 | 4:56:57 PM
Re: Apple vs FBI
Obviously they could not. The government does not really have resources and skills that Apple has.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2016 | 4:54:39 PM
Re: Dark Reading's Primer on FBI vs Apple
For me is it an easy choice, both FPI and Apple should stop scaring public with the terrorism stick and get back to work and do this in a way that that can only wok on that phone. They have been working on all other cases, this is not any different.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2016 | 4:48:26 PM
Re: Solid Support
That is how our laws are getting very complex and eventually costing regular hard working population. Apple and FBI is going to be just fine. They do not care about us.
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