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2/25/2016
10:20 AM
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Apple Reportedly Further Locking Down The iPhone

Apple is reportedly working on making it even harder to unlock its iPhone, upping the ante in its dispute with the FBI.

Apple reportedly is working on making the iPhone even more un-crackable such that the company would be unable to update an iPhone's software without the user's password. In addition, Apple is looking at ways to encrypt iPhone backups on iCloud.

News of Apple further locking down its newer phones was reported by various media outlets this week, quoting unnamed sources close the projects. The goal of these initiatives, of course, is to make it nearly impossible for Apple to comply with requests such as that of the FBI's to access an iPhone belonging to alleged San Bernardino terror suspect Syed Farook.

For more details on these latest developments, read this New York Times report and this Washington Post report.

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cyberpink
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cyberpink,
User Rank: Strategist
3/3/2016 | 10:50:34 AM
Apple, FBI and our privacy
Apple is doing exactly what you would expect.  This is not their first standoff with a government over cellphone security.  They have an ongoing standoff with China, who demands to have backdoors into their systems, which would give China a view at Apple's intellectual property.  There is no evidence that Apple has treated the situation with the US any differently than it has with China.  The main difference I see in the arguement is the US government protects our civil liberties, while the other foreign nation-states do not.  Apple is not giving in to anyone at this point.

Our FBI is tasked with protecting our civil liberties by catching and stopping the perpetrators before a lethal attack occurs.  In my eyes, the FBI is fighting to protect our civil liberties by taking a stand to protect the US homeland.  Being able to gain access to cell phone data is critical to their mission.

As a US born citizen, I feel privacy is important.  I agree with Apple's standoff.  I also agree with the FBI's demands.  My question is their a happy medium for all parties involved?  Both groups are being true to their mission - which has put them at odds.  I would really like so see a good resolution that benefits both security and privacy in our country.  Apple has always found their partnership with the FBI and the US government as beneficial.  I feel they can come to a reasonable resolution.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2016 | 12:30:57 PM
Others
One more thing, other should follow what apple is doing. They need to give responsibility of securing devices to users themselves. If I want to secure it I would if not I would not, neither apple nor government should be deciding that.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2016 | 12:30:35 PM
Re: Buck stops?
Also, I do not thing Tim Cook is personally liable on this, it is Apple, I f it was financial dispute it may end up with Tim Cook being responsible but this is not that.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2016 | 12:28:34 PM
Re: Buck stops?
If the government wants to pursue further they can, based on how court rules Apple has to comply regardless. The is the Republican of Apple. :--)).
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2016 | 12:26:30 PM
Re: Raising the bar
Agree. FBI can always get the information they are looking for with different means, such as talking to involved parties :--))
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2016 | 12:24:37 PM
Right strategy
This would be right strategy in my view so we do not have this non-sense conversation between a government and the private sector. 
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2016 | 7:47:13 AM
Buck stops?
I love how Apple is playing this. Doubling down shows it is really serious about the defence it's mounting which is great to see.

What I'm curious about now though is where the buck stops? If Apple flat out refuses to comply with the court's demands, does Tim Cook get in trouble legally? Are Apple employees forced at gunpoint to make the software changes?

How does it work if a company just says no?
RyanSepe
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0%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2016 | 2:24:53 PM
Raising the bar
Even though this is a shot at the FBI for their current quarrel, further locking down the iPhone increases its security. So even if the underlying cause is this incident, it has had a positive outcome for security.
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