Mobile
1/15/2014
02:03 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Feds Fail To Secure Mobile Devices

New study finds one-third of government workers use public WiFi and one-fourth don't password-protect the devices.

The federal government may have specific policies for security, but many of its users aren't adopting secure mobile practices and behaviors, according to a new study by the Mobile Work Exchange.

The public-private partnership's study, which was commissioned by Cisco Systems, is based on data gathered from the Mobile Work Exchange's self-assessment tool for organizations to measure the security of their mobile workforce. The report focused on tablets, smartphones, and laptops, and found that 90% of government users who were assessed by the tool use at least one of those devices for work.

More than 40% of government users are putting their agencies and devices at risk, according to the report, which encompassed 155 users and 30 different government agencies, mostly civilian. On the flip side, 86% lock their computers when they leave their desks and 78% store files in a secure place.

More than 30% use public wireless networks, the study found, 52% don't use multifactor authentication or encrypt their data, and 25% don't use passwords for their mobile devices

Read the rest of this story on Dark Reading.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Moderator
1/15/2014 | 3:38:37 PM
Re: Careful with the numbers
Are these figures really any different than those in the private sector?
WKash
50%
50%
WKash,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/15/2014 | 2:33:58 PM
Careful with the numbers
The warning from this report is fair.  Whether the magnitude of the problem is correct is another story.  These public-private research reports need to be viewed carefully as the numbers, and nature of respondents, is hardly statistically representative of government employees.

The fine print reveals: This report "reflects the calculator inputs of 155 individual government responses and 30 agency responses...and 97 individual and 24 organization responses from the private sector.  You can download the full study, by registering, which is the less obvious point of these research projects, at www.mobileworkexchange.com/2014tracker
.

 
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Flash Poll
Current Issue
Cartoon
Containing Corporate Data on Mobile Devices
Containing Corporate Data on Mobile Devices
If you’re still focused on securing endpoints, you’ve got your work cut out for you. WiFi network provider iPass surveyed 1,600 mobile workers and found that the average US employee carries three devices -- a smartphone, a computer, and a tablet or e-reader -- with more than 80% of them doing work on personal devices.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-0103
Published: 2014-07-29
WebAccess in Zarafa before 7.1.10 and WebApp before 1.6 stores credentials in cleartext, which allows local Apache users to obtain sensitive information by reading the PHP session files.

CVE-2014-0475
Published: 2014-07-29
Multiple directory traversal vulnerabilities in GNU C Library (aka glibc or libc6) before 2.20 allow context-dependent attackers to bypass ForceCommand restrictions and possibly have other unspecified impact via a .. (dot dot) in a (1) LC_*, (2) LANG, or other locale environment variable.

CVE-2014-0889
Published: 2014-07-29
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in IBM Atlas Suite (aka Atlas Policy Suite), as used in Atlas eDiscovery Process Management through 6.0.3, Disposal and Governance Management for IT through 6.0.3, and Global Retention Policy and Schedule Management through 6.0.3, allow remote atta...

CVE-2014-2226
Published: 2014-07-29
Ubiquiti UniFi Controller before 3.2.1 logs the administrative password hash in syslog messages, which allows man-in-the-middle attackers to obtains sensitive information via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2014-3020
Published: 2014-07-29
install.sh in the Embedded WebSphere Application Server (eWAS) 7.0 before FP33 in IBM Tivoli Integrated Portal (TIP) 2.1 and 2.2 sets world-writable permissions for the installRoot directory tree, which allows local users to gain privileges via a Trojan horse program.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio