Android AV Improves But Still Can't Nuke Malware

Google doesn't let Android antivirus app makers automatically quarantine and zap malware. Until then it's up to users to stay on their toes to prevent infection.

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User Rank: Apprentice
12/19/2013 | 6:08:47 AM
Re: Misinformed
Engineering rationales are fine, but some people will end up with malware on their system. So, given Android's mass adoption now, I think the Windows analogy is apt:

1) If your PC gets infected by a virus, do you want it to be quarantined?
2) If your Android tablet gets infected by a virus, do you want it to be quarantined?

I'd argue that the average consumer would answer "yes" to both questions. 

As you say, the malware threat is overstated. To add to that: Bigger-picture, Google -- or an AV vendor that it taps, or any OEM -- could build AV capabilties into Android. That way, you wouldn't have the risk of a third-party application escaping the sandbox. 
User Rank: Apprentice
12/18/2013 | 11:50:08 AM
Re: Misinformed
steveb2005 is bang on. Come on guys, stop with the scare-mongering.
User Rank: Apprentice
12/18/2013 | 9:57:24 AM
I'm tired of misinformed articles about Android security.  It makes sense not to allow any 3rd party application out of the sandbox, and there is no need to, despite the news hype.  Read up:
User Rank: Apprentice
12/17/2013 | 7:50:08 PM
Droid attacks
Sounds like a new Starwars movie. I guess that being alerted to malware is better than not being alerted but when is Google going to let these apps get rid of the malware? Or are they waiting to put out a google created app?
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