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Verizon Patches Trio of Vulnerabilities in Home Router
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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
4/12/2019 | 10:48:58 AM
Re: Boiling this down
Agree on remote admin - I never manage the router from remote anywhere and ONLY do it at home at my desk.  The very idea invites hacking anyway.  Kinda like keeping the front door closed but unlocked.  Do it at your risk but most home routers have users who don't know the first thing about mostly anything. 
username007
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username007,
User Rank: Strategist
4/10/2019 | 8:47:02 AM
Boiling this down
So lets boil this down. Routers are not really impacted by this and it takes extra work to make these exploits work. Since the default configuration does not allow for any of this to happen remotely, and by-and-far the majority of these are home routers (i.e. not public businesses), what exactly is the threat vector here... an angry teenager?

Let us get real for a minute. Are the vulnerabilities real? Of course they are but we have to take into consideration when these will actually be an issue. If a person has to be socially engineered to turn on these remote features, that means those people can be engineered to do a lot of other things too. The use cases seem stretched and if someone has access to the admin password it is expected that they can do admin things.

Adding the bit about small offices at the bottom muddies the waters here and really pulls into question why even mention it. Most users are not turning on remote admin capabilities, and those that do should be understanding the risks involved.


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