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The Equifax Breach One Year Later: 6 Action Items for Security Pros
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REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
9/18/2018 | 3:25:26 PM
Re: Passwords, people. Passwords.
GAO report - breach caused by a misconfigured device that monitored network traffic - and this device let encrypted data through and out.  This misconfig was caused by one ----- ONE FOLKS ----- expired certificate.  There, just one thing.   Incredible.  SANS INSTITUTE NEWSLETTER: 

QUOTE

A report from the US government Accountability Office (GAO) on the Equifax breach found that the company had to look at the attackers' database queries to determine exactly what information had been compromised. (The breach affected more than 165 million people worldwide.) The report found that "while Equifax had installed a device to inspect network traffic for evidence of malicious activity, a misconfiguration allowed encrypted traffic to pass through the network without being inspected." The misconfiguration was due to an expired certificate.
DorisHuntley
50%
50%
DorisHuntley,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/17/2018 | 10:23:18 AM
Re: Passwords, people. Passwords.
Rignt
lunny
100%
0%
lunny,
User Rank: Strategist
9/13/2018 | 12:58:06 PM
Passwords, people. Passwords.
The core problem was that it was easy for the attackers to obtain the credentials to access the databases.  The Struts vulnerability was simply the unlocked bedroom window the theives used to enter the house.  It could have been one of any number of access points.  If the IDs and credentials for the database systems were properly protected, this would have never become news.  There was initial focus on some poor scapegoat IT director who didn't patch in time.  But I'll bet you a dollar on a doughnut that if he had tried, his application owners would have screamed, "We can't patch now!  We have a major product release that day/week/month that can't be delayed!"  These are the same application owners who think it's just fine to still be running their applications on obsolete operating systems, etc.  Until this industry gets credential security management under control, everyone's just whistling past the graveyard worrying about patching a million vulnerabilities.  Almost every breach boils down to easily obtained passwords to key data assets.  It's still too easy for the bad guys.  Heaven help the enterprise where the attacker is an insider.
BradleyRoss
100%
0%
BradleyRoss,
User Rank: Strategist
9/11/2018 | 4:42:22 PM
Admit you have a problem and that it must be fixed
I think the main need is for a change in attitudes.  You have to decentralize the operation, but also have to understand what decentralization means.  You have to assume that one of the major components of the system will be completely compromised.  You have to decide how you can prevent a compromised component from damaging the integrity of the whole system.  Being able to convince upper management that the system is secure is not enough, it actually must be secure.  Upper management can't rely on people telling them the truth, especially if it is felt that telling the truth will get you fired.  If the people under you say that making the system secure will cost money, you have to be willing to spend money.  I had a manager that he didn't like working with experienced people because they kept telling him about things that needed to be fixed.


RIP, 'IT Security'
Kevin Kurzawa, Senior Information Security Auditor,  11/13/2018
Understanding Evil Twin AP Attacks and How to Prevent Them
Ryan Orsi, Director of Product Management for Wi-Fi at WatchGuard Technologies,  11/14/2018
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