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4 Basic Principles to Help Keep Hackers Out
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2018 | 7:52:42 PM
Re: CIO-CISO conflict
@Christian: Alas, the trend of high-level execs simply outsourcing anything cybersecurity-related wholesale -- strategy and all -- without much forethought -- continues, as I recently observed for a Dark Reading sister site here: securitynow.com/author.asp?section_id=613&doc_id=738870

While I generally agree with you, I will say that one thing that concerns me about stereotypes and stereotypical perceptions is the generalized notion (certainly not all of them) of hackers and IT admins and devs pooh-poohing the lawyers and compliance peeps, which could be problematic for a CISO if that view pervaded to that level.

Of course, technically, security, compliance, and privacy are all three separate circles on the Venn diagram of data stewardship... perhaps we need a Chief Data Steward to oversee -- or, at least, help integrate -- all three.
No SOPA
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No SOPA,
User Rank: Ninja
7/6/2018 | 3:26:53 PM
Re: CIO-CISO conflict
To Joe's point, as a past code-monkey I definitely was guilty of seeing CISO leaders as just another C-Level lackey.  I've been reading a lot more articles the last couple years that identify the role of CISO of suffering not only in that area, but also from the general perception that the real InfoSec knowledge sits with lower-level managers and hackers.  When I was younger, we saw the C-Levels pimping expensive software packages, trying to fill gaps in process with bloatware and 3rd party vendors.  From my perspective, the real talent reading whitepapers, following cutting edge tech from visionaries and testing out new code ideas in virtual environments were the grunts in the code trenches, not the C-Levels, not the CISOs, but the front-line cyber defenders who never slept, never wore a suit, and so on.  I could point to plenty of CISOs now who came up from those trenches and have earned respect and the right to be heard, but in the overall business model, I'm afraid the CISO is still not seen any differently than the rest of the often disposable and (frankly) figure-head C-Level roles.  I think if that role were carefully trimmed and only truly qualified and knowledgeable hackers were placed there, the idea of the CISO as a "lackey" or "underling" might fade and the industry also start moving away from the C-Level chains that so many Enterprise organizations still suffer from.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/5/2018 | 2:28:26 PM
CIO-CISO conflict
Unfixed flaws and unpatched vulnerabilities will remain an issue as long as the CISO is treated as some sort of underling -- whether a direct report or not -- to the CIO. The CIO is judged against business agility objectives, which can run completely counter to the interests of the CISO's office.


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