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Microsoft Issues Emergency Patch to Disable Intel's Broken Spectre Fix
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BrianN060
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BrianN060,
User Rank: Strategist
1/30/2018 | 7:42:22 PM
Re: A question for DR
@Dr.T. "...Hopefully these variants will end soon."  I don't see how they could - but then I'm not on conference calls with the big players.  Maybe they have, or can, come to an agreed roadmap of mitigation waypoints, towards a solution.  If so, that would be a real achievement.  Without that, whatever one does will tilt the table for the others.  That goes for chip/OS and OS/ISVs (so chip/ISVs, as well).  With the pressure (public, political, contractual), on all of them, I imagine it's like playing the Twister game paced to a Bach Fugue. 
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:34:02 PM
Re: A question for DR
That is a very real possibility, and indeed it does question how Intel (and its competitors) can better build on-chip security, Intel has mot steak in this than others so it would be more important for them to get it right.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:32:39 PM
Re: A question for DR
Just wondering if on-chip security was really the best path, to begin with? It's like designing a hammer that will prevent you from hitting That is a real good question to ask. Any flow in HW would be hard to fix, maybe we need to evaluate options for HW independence.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:29:42 PM
Re: A question for DR
what happens when a new hardware vulnerability is discovered in those? That will be a real blow to intel, they my even go out of business for that.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:26:34 PM
Re: A question for DR
How are things going at your organization? We are mainly applying patches released by Microsoft. Not much other options.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:25:30 PM
Re: A question for DR
The real fix to these flaws is a new generation of microprocessors, which will likely take years for most organizations to adopt. That makes sense, I am also wondering if there is way to fix exiting CPUs for new devices.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:23:43 PM
Re: A question for DR
The patches don't really fix anything--they just mitigate exploits- I think that is why we need to go to a real solution, performance hit is not really acceptable.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:22:06 PM
Re: A question for DR
The patches/updates were obviously rushed without time to properly vet and test them. That makes sense. They would still see problems when they deploy it to mass market.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:20:33 PM
Re: A question for DR
Would the last few weeks of chaos been avoided, if the confidentially informed vendors had more time before public disclosure? I hear you, I would say it would be the same, they would not take action until last minute.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2018 | 7:19:22 PM
Re: A question for DR
Once we learned that underlying vulnerability was multi-chip-vendor (so multi-OS and Applications), we knew a long series of mitigation and fix iterations was inevitable. That makes sense. Hopefully these variants will end soon.
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