Comments
Five Arrested for Cerber, CTB-Locker Ransomware Spread
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Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2017 | 4:41:23 PM
Re: Never pay the ransom
But many small businesses and some large ones (Merck) don't have a tested plan in place - ergo? I am not suprise about this, I have involved a few other big companies and they are not there yet either.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2017 | 4:39:34 PM
Re: Never pay the ransom
Also, never open an attachment received from someone you don't know This is a good suggestion, that may be better options than anything else we can do.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2017 | 4:37:41 PM
Re: Never pay the ransom
This includes regularly backing up the data stored on your computer, Sometime backup is encrypted too, so it needs to be an off-site backup in my view.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2017 | 4:36:14 PM
Re: Never pay the ransom
Never pay the ransom I would agree however if you do not have a backup and data is lost, you do not have so much options.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2017 | 4:34:29 PM
Arrest
I say arrest is a good news it represents there are consequences for their actions and they can not get away with it.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
12/22/2017 | 2:01:37 PM
Re: Never pay the ransom
Ransomeware is a 900 pound paper tiger.  IF you do not have a good backup and restoration plan, you are screwed.  IF you have a tested plan in place --- hey, the only real issue is data exfiltration.  But many small businesses and some large ones (Merck) don't have a tested plan in place - ergo? 
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
12/22/2017 | 10:09:32 AM
Never pay the ransom
This is an item that I have advocated for quite some time. Ransomware though easy to execute is also easy to mitigate. This comes directly from the linked article:

"This includes regularly backing up the data stored on your computer, keeping your systems up to date and installing robust antivirus software. Also, never open an attachment received from someone you don't know or any odd looking link or email sent by a friend on social media, a company, online gaming partner, etc."


White House Cybersecurity Strategy at a Crossroads
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The Fundamental Flaw in Security Awareness Programs
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