Comments
'Starwars' Debuts on List of Worst Passwords of 2017
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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/5/2018 | 12:05:58 PM
Re: My recommendation
True enough about hobbies in general.  The vocabulatory and usage combinatoins is what does count.  You can like history enough to choose a segment of it as a small dictionery reference tool, i.e. words and numbers used in combination plus odd characters.  Ok, easy enough - but the combinations are what DOES matter.  And those can be astronomical indeed.  I have about 10 password combos in use at any one time --- but they are composed of words-numbers-char that are very difficult to crack unless you know my base logic which I am not spekaing of here for obvious reasons. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/23/2017 | 5:51:26 PM
Re: My recommendation
@REISEN: Eh. Hobbies aren't necessarily *that* unique. People who pay any attention to me on social, for example, have an idea of the kind of stuff I'm into.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/23/2017 | 5:50:22 PM
Re: Password Complexity Policy
@Ryan: Yeah, but what's even worse are IT-enforced security questions where you can only choose from a very short list of questions to which the answers are easily found or guessed.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/23/2017 | 5:49:23 PM
Re: My recommendation
@RyanSepe: Unless your hobbies *are* Star Wars-related...

The problem with using hobbies as the basis of passwords is that, often, hobbies are at least somewhat public in this day and age.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
12/19/2017 | 10:30:43 AM
Re: Bill Murray
...pretty sure he used the tune from "The Love Boat."
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
12/19/2017 | 10:22:44 AM
Bill Murray
For some strange reason, I keep hearing Bill Murray's lounge lizard sketch on SNL, where he crooned that silly "Star Wars" song.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
12/19/2017 | 9:43:40 AM
Re: My recommendation
Precisely - hobbies are UNIQUE and we all REMEMBER them very well.  You can use an abundance of tech terms whether history or just simple knitting and bunch together with any special character and there is a solid password without revealing ANY family details to give it away.  
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
12/19/2017 | 9:38:29 AM
Re: My recommendation
It is a matter of retention and complexity. Ships work for you and the same can be said for others. Mold your hobbies into a passphrase is a much better practice than 'starwars'.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
12/19/2017 | 9:36:53 AM
Password Complexity Policy
For every single password in this list, it is abundantly transparent for why enforcing password complexity is paramount. Left to ones own devices many would create a password that could be cracked in a matter of seconds.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
12/19/2017 | 9:00:35 AM
My recommendation
Users like passwords that are easy to remember - and this list certainly qualifies for dumb and dumber.  So for my 2 cents, everyone has a HOBBY - something unique to us that WE know and enjoy.  For me it is history and ships and there are any number of unique combinations I can mold data INTO to make a secure password and I WILL NEVER FORGET IT.  Easy. 


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