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Ethical Hacking: The Most Important Job No One Talks About
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NSHAH
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NSHAH,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/23/2017 | 6:00:06 PM
Offensive Security Mindset is Vital
Well written article articulating the importance of ethical hacking in light of the dynamic threat landscape. Resources cited are very useful. An effort to get a certification exposes one to structured approach and one can learn a lot from a fundamental knowledge perspective and continue to build on that with large number of on-line resources available. Things have dramatically changed over the course of last few years in terms of access to learning experiences. There are plenty of on-line resources to get a hands on learning experiences including but not limited to Kali Linux (https://www.kali.org/), Pentesterlab (https://pentesterlab.com/), vulnerability hub (https://www.vulnhub.com/), seminars (Defcon, Blackhat, local cons, etc.) webinars and local chapter meetings from professional security organizations (ISSA, ISC2, ISACA, HTCIA, etc.)

 
aashbel
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aashbel,
User Rank: Author
3/22/2017 | 1:06:11 PM
Re: Blurry Lines, but Important Distinction
Hey MarkW35801,

I definitely agree with your point of viiew. I think that in a few years we will be seing ethical hackers more frequently employed by a wider variety of businesses. The work has to start though much earlier by creating proper formal education programs as part of comuter sciences degrees. I think that educating developers and creating a hybrid security and development engineer could also make the process more fluent especially considering the fast paced development environments we are seing today. I agree that good pen testing services are important but as you say, they are expensive. By having developers part of the security effort pen test cycles will shorten and become much more effective. 

 

Thanks

Amit
ramgopalvarma219
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ramgopalvarma219,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/20/2017 | 2:46:37 AM
Re: Blurry Lines, but Important Distinction
 

 

 

    Hi , Thanks for the article regarding Ethical Hacking , It was informative :)
MarkW35801
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50%
MarkW35801,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/16/2017 | 11:22:19 AM
Blurry Lines, but Important Distinction
Being an ethical hacker since late 2000, I can't agree with you more that it's a very important job. And I say this not because I want to remain employed, but because of the places we've been able to break into, and resulting impact to the organization should an attacker have done what we were able to do.

For example:

- we were able to fully compromise a large Western city in a few hours. Complete control of everything - security cameras, badging system. We were able to remote open the police gun vault, the police holding cell...

- using an unauthenticated SQL injection attack over the Internet, we were able to download the entire database of a background check company. Every person they had ever conducted a background check on - all their gory personal details...

We find very serious vulnerabilities, most of which are NOT identified by a vulnerability scanner. We apply logic and reasoning to identify a vulnerability, exploit it, and see where it gets us. Often times when we gain "the keys to the kingdom", we exploit a series of vulnerabilities - it's never just one thing.

A good penetration test isn't cheap, and a cheap penetration test isn't good. But we often find issues that would put a company out of business, so in the end, I believe we are worth the cost.


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