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The Hidden Dangers Of 'Bring Your Own Body'
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JulietteRizkallah
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JulietteRizkallah,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2016 | 2:39:10 PM
Think about the OPM breach is far more worse for individuals
I agree, we have only one body but can have many passwords.  I reminds me of the OPM breach in which sensistive data about former gov't employees and their family was stolen, information that you cannot erase and replace, information that can identity an individual solely.  But yet still information, not a finger, a pupil, a heart...i am staying away for biometrics until we have a better answer on how to keep that data safe...i am sure it will be a while.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 9:43:53 PM
Re: what will happen after a breach?
@Whoopty: The methodology might be the trick to it, but these types of biometrics -- fingerprints, heart rhythms, etc. -- are pretty replicable.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 9:40:24 PM
Re: what will happen after a breach?
"The aftermath of that data breach cost me an arm and a leg!"
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 9:39:40 PM
Re: Security
Multiple InfoSec experts I know put it this way: You have ten fingers and ten toes -- and that's it.  But the number of possible passwords you can have is nearly infinite.

Besides: biometrics aren't generally protected under the 4th Amendment, whereas passwords (sometimes) are.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2016 | 7:28:23 AM
Re: what will happen after a breach?
Try a heart transplant! Biometric data can use internal metrics like your own unique heart rhythm, so I don't think plastic surgery would cut it. 
hykerfred
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hykerfred,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/29/2016 | 10:13:16 AM
what will happen after a breach?
What will happen when your biometrical data has been breached? Will you be fired or forced to take a long vacation since you are the vulnerability? Or will the company just provide you with some plastic surgery? :)
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2016 | 6:58:53 AM
Security
I definitely want real safeguards in place before I hand over any biometric data to any companies. As you point out, while biometric data is more unique than passwords and other forms of security, it's still only as useful as the security in place protecting that data.

I'm also concerned that the NSA and other intelligence agencies would love to get their hands on that sort of data. I'd want guarantees that it would only be sent over in the case of a warranted, criminal investigation, not just scooped up randomly when I use it for a login.


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