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Smart Cities' 4 Biggest Security Challenges
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/4/2015 | 9:13:42 AM
Re: Smarter Cities Securoty Challenges
@Peter: Indeed, malware even found its way onto the International Space Station via an infected flash drive!

It really makes me paranoid about accepting free flash drives from vendors at conferences; that's for sure.
Peter Williams
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Peter Williams,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/2/2015 | 4:57:10 PM
Smarter Cities Securoty Challenges
Actually - far from Nest and such being the issue, I would guess that the the bigger threat to infrastructure is ancient PLCs being found on Shodan that still have the manufacturer's default password hard coded into them...That, and some idiot sticking an infected flash-drive in the machine running the SCADA system.

One angle that may offer some hope is the growing focus on resilience, where the need for multi -disciplinary working etc to plan for and manage disasters seems to be inceasingly accepted.  At least some cities include cyber events in their resilience planning - maybe we could make it more widespread?

 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2015 | 6:06:34 AM
Las Vegas
The Las Vegas example got me thinking about what would happen if the Strip were shut down for a day.

And, having worked for the Nevada Attorney General in a role that dealt, in part, with utilities issues, the first thing that came into my mind was that -- despite the economic loss -- there'd be a HUGE savings in energy and natural resources.
Blog Voyage
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Blog Voyage,
User Rank: Strategist
7/2/2015 | 2:55:40 AM
What a big work
Very nice ideas, but it will be a very hard work. As you know, security is a very difficult job. Wait and see.


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