Comments
Why Security Awareness Alone Wont Stop Hackers
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SSERGIO123
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SSERGIO123,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/6/2015 | 10:16:04 AM
Re: Weak link
But that´s exactly my point, it is NOT easy. It´s hard work. That´s why almost nobody does it.
xmarksthespot
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xmarksthespot,
User Rank: Strategist
3/6/2015 | 9:00:33 AM
Re: Security culture
The article brings up important details about the basics of information security. 

Unpatched Microsoft Office was necessary for this ploy to work.  The attack highlights the importance of applying all security patches in a timely manner.  Most banks were not susceptible to the attack due to proper patching.

The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), non-profit organization focusing on improving software security, places Security Misconfiguration as number 5 in it's top ten list of security concerns.

Exploitability is specified as Easy, but detectability of misconfiguration is specified as Easy.  Prevalance is specified as Common but I would assume that the banking industry as a whole is well protected compared to all other industries.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/5/2015 | 11:51:40 PM
Re: Security culture
@Preeti: I had the pleasure to attend a cybersecurity conference some time ago where a representative from the Israeli consulate spoke, and he told the audience that in Israel, cybersecurity is indeed something that is focused on at an early age -- and that students are given the opportunity to focus their studies on cybersecurity as early as high school.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/5/2015 | 11:49:56 PM
Re: Weak link
@SSERGIO123: Good point.  But then, if it was easy, everyone would do it.  ;)
jefawcet
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jefawcet,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2015 | 6:44:12 PM
Reduce the attack surface by taking out the user (somewhat)
Even with the best end user training you are doing well to get 50% effectiveness.  Supplement the end user training with removing the chance that they user will click on the spam link with a secure email gateway.   Remove the chance that a user is going to a compromised site (poison well) using a secure web gateway, secure cloud gateway.   I find doing the above is quite effective.
PreetiS347
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PreetiS347,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2015 | 11:28:15 AM
Re: Security culture
 I believe the concept of security should start right from the elementary school. The kids in school use computers. They should be given security classes as well. This process in the long run will inculcate the security culture. Just like we teach our kids to be aware of strangers, not be over friendly with people you don't know well and to let your parents know of everything that's happening with you, We can teach them how to be safe in the cyberworld. What are the signs that you are being hacked, not to release your PII to random forms and surveys etc. All this will develop the approach of being alert and logging all important security rules in the back of your  mind just like a well developed IDS.

 For the corporate world, the periodic emails showing the unusual activity is a good option but I guess there should be a team that re-screens these emails and then give  the employees an alert when an action is required. Like it is mentioned that people from bank have so many emails in a day that it is quite possible for them to miss out on the important one from security. Training I guess has no substitute. The more you know , the more you do.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
3/3/2015 | 10:09:08 AM
Re: Security culture > self audit
I think a  self audit could work for me, if the emails/reports were concise and showed me my activity in a manner that was easy to scan and spot anomalies. I get a spam filter report every day. And while I don't religiously open it, I do read it often enough so that I can tag emails that are mistakenly quaranteened. 
SSERGIO123
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SSERGIO123,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2015 | 7:46:49 AM
Weak link
The weak link is the hacker´s command and control server. If we analize all outbound IPs, we will detect those which are not kosher and will be able to block them. Hard work? Yes. So?
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/3/2015 | 5:40:15 AM
Security culture
This is the difference between security awareness in certain offices (the C-suite, the compliance/audit department, the general counsel's office, etc.) and security culture.  It comes down to convincing everyone, from the top down, that security is important.

Of course, in the particular example given, I'm not convinced a "self-audit" would be particularly helpful.  People in banking deal with thousands of emails a day; in numerous organizations they are even routinely encouraged -- if they do not take the initiative themselves -- to fudge the seeming "minutiae" a bit simply to satisfy the audit department because they feel they wouldn't ever get anything done otherwise.

So it's nice to have the policy in place...but you have to convince your staff that the policy is worth following.  That can often be easier said than done.


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