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Cost Of A Data Breach Jumps By 23%
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securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2014 | 4:10:42 PM
Re: Downloading the Ponemon report
Sure
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/16/2014 | 4:09:10 PM
Re: Downloading the Ponemon report
That research sounds intersting, @securityaffairs. I hope you can share some of your findings with us at some point.. 
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2014 | 9:44:43 AM
Re: Downloading the Ponemon report
Hi Marlyn, 

I'm currently working to the analysis of the cost for the data breach that impacted 80% of South Korean ... it could have a social impact of different $ Billions ... and many other incident had similar or greater impact
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/16/2014 | 9:27:13 AM
Re: Downloading the Ponemon report
I totally agree with you, @securityaffairs. These numbers give us a window into the total cost -- and probably not the whole picture. But they the trend will be continue to grow higher over time.
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2014 | 5:46:36 AM
Re: Downloading the Ponemon report
Very interesting ... but I believe that it is just the ti of the iceberg ... a serious evaluation of the cost os a data breach is quite impossible for a multitude of factor that concurs to its qualification. 

Consider that in many cases analytic data are not available ...

the figures provided give us just an excellent view of the current trend ... but I believe that cost is higher

 
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
10/15/2014 | 1:11:53 PM
Downloading the Ponemon report
Here's a URL for how to get the full report, which went live today:

http://www8.hp.com/us/en/software-solutions/ponemon-cyber-security-report/index.html?jumpid=va_mq32xtevyi
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/15/2014 | 10:46:57 AM
Re: The real cost of security
"it's easier to impose security on a more uniform environment than on a complex, heterogeneous enterprise environment."

I agree with it. Some of these problems are coming from an old system that has been forgotten and not shutdown while everybody is happy on a new environment, this simple old technology would easily bring down whole enterprise network.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/15/2014 | 10:42:39 AM
Re: Pressure points for change
I agree. At the same time, some companies do not see the pressure of regulations. If you are not in contact with the government, it is less likely you cover the expense of putting proper measures in place coming from regulations.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/15/2014 | 10:38:23 AM
too much money
It looks like however you look at it recovering from an attack is always costlier than preventing it. What is more scary is that we have been hearing these attacks lately more often than earlier in the past so there is an exponential upward trend. It is time to take put different measure such as identify who is behind and punishing them for what they did.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
10/15/2014 | 10:35:57 AM
Re: Pressure points for change
Interesting. It's too bad, though, that it still takes compliance to force their hand. There should be a more strategic view about breach inevitability. 
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