Comments
Internet Of Things Contains Average Of 25 Vulnerabilities Per Device
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markoer
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markoer,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/30/2014 | 6:06:36 AM
Re: Ok, but....
Thanks a lot, Kelly!
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 2:43:42 PM
Re: Ok, but....
Here you go: http://fortifyprotect.com/HP_IoT_Research_Study.pdf

The link has now been added to the story, too. Thanks!
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 2:41:22 PM
Re: Ok, but....
Here you go: http://fortifyprotect.com/HP_IoT_Research_Study.pdf

The link has now been added to the story, too. Thanks!
markoer
50%
50%
markoer,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/29/2014 | 12:08:28 PM
Ok, but....
...where is the link to the HP study?...
GonzSTL
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50%
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 10:53:30 AM
Re: 25 vulns/device
I think we have come to accept that all things are vulnerable, so it really boils down to a risk vs benefit/utility analysis. If vulnerabilities can be mitigated without outweighing the benefit or utility, then it becomes an organizational decision. On a personal level, my smartphone is an essential need, but the need to control my home thermostat remotely just doesn't have the same level of utility as my phone, and is the last thing I need to worry about. I guess it all comes down to a matter of priorities.
Marilyn Cohodas
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50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 9:44:33 AM
25 vulns/device
That seems pretty high to me, but how does that compare to, for instance, a typical smartphone or tablet? I'd also be curious to know if OWASP has info abut which are most vulnerabe IoT devices on the market.


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