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8/22/2014
02:49 PM
Sara Peters
Sara Peters
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JP Morgan Targeted In New Phishing Campaign

Double-whammy 'Smash and Grab' hits targets with two ways to steal credentials.

Corporate email provider Proofpoint discovered a new phishing campaign, this week, aimed at customers of JP Morgan Chase & Co.

The campaign has been dubbed "Smash and Grab" because it combines two methods of obtaining access credentials.

It uses social engineering tactics to try to persuade users to part with their JP Morgan credentials, specifically, by asking them to click to view a secure message from the bank. It also infects the target with Dyre, a banking Trojan that lifts login data for other places too.

The attack appears to have been launched on Tuesday. Proofpoint saw roughly 150,000 of the phishing emails that day.

Sara Peters is Senior Editor at Dark Reading and formerly the editor-in-chief of Enterprise Efficiency. Prior that she was senior editor for the Computer Security Institute, writing and speaking about virtualization, identity management, cybersecurity law, and a myriad ... View Full Bio

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AnonymousMan
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AnonymousMan,
User Rank: Moderator
8/25/2014 | 8:53:32 AM
Re: Chase encourages phishing
I was just being sarcastic.  Simple misspelling are possible, but I would suggest something like chasesecurityalert.com or similar.  I don't buy your second argument.  The "no hyperlinks in email" only works for sophisticated users.  For the general population, that HTML email train has left the station IMHO.  It might transfer some risk from the bank to the user though, which is all the more reason to take that approach if you are the bank.
JohnRS
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JohnRS,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/22/2014 | 5:42:48 PM
Re: Chase encourages phishing
It's possible.  First, phishing mail claiming to be from a company often comes from a "look alike" domain, something like chasse.com for example.  DMARK doesn't stop this sort of mail at all.

Second, a Chase customer will be more likely to click on a link in a phishing message because regular, valid messages from Chase encourage them to do so.  In their "E-mail Security Information" at the bottom of many of the messages which Chase sends to customers they tell them that if they suspect the authenticity of the message, to "click here" (a link inside the suspect message) - the exact OPPOSITE of what they should be advising customers to do.
AnonymousMan
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AnonymousMan,
User Rank: Moderator
8/22/2014 | 5:15:51 PM
Re: Chase encourages phishing
http://agari.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/130819_Dmarc_JPMorgan.pdf

"JP Morgan Chase evaluated its options and embraced the DMARC (Domain-based Messaging Authentication and Controls) standard to stop phishing attacks, restore its brand and protect its customers."

emphasis added.  You see, JP Morgan can't be phished anymore.  Nothing to see here folks.
JohnRS
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JohnRS,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/22/2014 | 3:04:27 PM
Chase encourages phishing
A phishing attack might be more effective against Chase customers than expected since Chase encourages customers to click on links in phishing messages.

I have some accounts with Chase.  Recently I realized that the boilerplate at the bottom of many of their messages includes instructions regarding phishing messages which is the OPPOSITE of what you should do.  Here it is, from a block boldly labelled "E-mail Security Information":

"If you are concerned about the authenticity of this message, please click here or call the phone number on the back of your credit card. If you would like to learn more about e-mail security or want to report a suspicious e-mail, click here".

Yes, Chase is telling you (twice) to click on a link in a suspected phishing message.  Duh!
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