Operations // Identity & Access Management
12/11/2013
11:06 AM
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

How To Win A Cartoon Caption Contest (Tech Version)

Take home the gold in our brand new cartoon caption contest by following these simple rules: Be funnier and enter more.

I hope you’ve gotten a few LOLs from our new cartoonist John Klossner. In recent weeks, John has taken shots at enterprise security and the hardware upgrade cycle -- and you can expect more of the same in the months ahead.

For now, and in the spirit of the holiday season, we thought it would be fun to add another element of audience participation to the new InformationWeek with our first -- and definitely not last -- cartoon caption contest. Here's how it works.

We supply the cartoon, you write the caption
To enter, you must be a registered site member. If you haven't signed up yet, take a minute to register now. Also, be sure to read the terms and conditions of the Name That Toon contest before you post your caption in the comment section. At the conclusion of the contest, John and the InformationWeek editors will choose a winner and runner-up, who will receive a $25 and $10 Amazon gift card respectively. The winning caption will appear online with the cartoon in early January.

For those of you who know a good cartoon when you see one but don't want to write a caption, you can still exert influence by voting on the submissions. Click thumbs up for cartoons you think are funny. As always, editorial comments and cheers for your favorites are encouraged and welcomed.

Vote early and vote often
Now, a bit of advice on how to write a funny caption from Robert Mankoff, the cartoon editor from the New Yorker magazine, which has been publishing cartoons since 1925 and conducting caption contests since 2005. Mankoff wrote in a blog last year that the secret to writing a good cartoon caption (and winning a contest) involves two things: Be funnier and enter more. "Why? Because if you have any talent for anything, and that includes captioneering, you get better by doing more of it," Mankoff wrote.

I would argue that the same could also be said about being a CIO, CTO, or anyone in IT leading projects in big data, cloud, security, and infrastructure for the enterprise, government, or healthcare.

Now let’s have some fun: Click on our contest page, Name That Toon, Win a Prize, and submit your caption in the comment section. Our panel of experts will review the entries and pick a winner by January 5. Good luck and may be best tech win!

Marilyn Cohodas has been covering technology and building community for business, government, and consumer audiences for over 20 years.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/17/2013 | 3:44:43 PM
How to win a cartoon caption contest
We've got a record-breaking number of entries in our cartoon caption contest. (True it is our first one!) But there is still time to submit yours! If you'd rather just share in the fun, read the entries and vote for your favorite. We will be selecting a winner January 5.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/11/2013 | 12:04:41 PM
How to Lose a Cartoon Caption Contest
In case you're wondering how NOT to write a caption, you can you can take comfort from the likes of comedian Zach Galifianakis and NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who have repeatedly tried and failed to win the New Yorker cartoon caption competition, according to The Wall Street Journal .

The Journal also offers a quantitative analysis by consumer psychologist Peter McGraw and cognitive scientist Phil Fernbach on the formula for winning captions: 

Among the findings: captions that use words that are uncommon in other entries were more likely to make the shortlist, as were captions that didn't refer to concrete elements in the cartoon. Other rules of thumb: avoid exclamation points and keep entries short.


Let the competition begin!

Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-2595
Published: 2014-08-31
The device-initialization functionality in the MSM camera driver for the Linux kernel 2.6.x and 3.x, as used in Qualcomm Innovation Center (QuIC) Android contributions for MSM devices and other products, enables MSM_CAM_IOCTL_SET_MEM_MAP_INFO ioctl calls for an unrestricted mmap interface, which all...

CVE-2013-2597
Published: 2014-08-31
Stack-based buffer overflow in the acdb_ioctl function in audio_acdb.c in the acdb audio driver for the Linux kernel 2.6.x and 3.x, as used in Qualcomm Innovation Center (QuIC) Android contributions for MSM devices and other products, allows attackers to gain privileges via an application that lever...

CVE-2013-2598
Published: 2014-08-31
app/aboot/aboot.c in the Little Kernel (LK) bootloader, as distributed with Qualcomm Innovation Center (QuIC) Android contributions for MSM devices and other products, allows attackers to overwrite signature-verification code via crafted boot-image load-destination header values that specify memory ...

CVE-2013-2599
Published: 2014-08-31
A certain Qualcomm Innovation Center (QuIC) patch to the NativeDaemonConnector class in services/java/com/android/server/NativeDaemonConnector.java in Code Aurora Forum (CAF) releases of Android 4.1.x through 4.3.x enables debug logging, which allows attackers to obtain sensitive disk-encryption pas...

CVE-2013-6124
Published: 2014-08-31
The Qualcomm Innovation Center (QuIC) init scripts in Code Aurora Forum (CAF) releases of Android 4.1.x through 4.4.x allow local users to modify file metadata via a symlink attack on a file accessed by a (1) chown or (2) chmod command, as demonstrated by changing the permissions of an arbitrary fil...

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
This episode of Dark Reading Radio looks at infosec security from the big enterprise POV with interviews featuring Ron Plesco, Cyber Investigations, Intelligence & Analytics at KPMG; and Chris Inglis & Chris Bell of Securonix.