Perimeter
Guest Blog // Selected Security Content Provided By Sophos
What's This?
9/10/2013
03:06 PM
Maxim Weinstein
Maxim Weinstein
Security Insights
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

How To Train Your Users

Help users contribute to your organization's security by teaching them to protect The Four Cs: computers, credentials, connections, and content

Let's face it: Getting users to understand and practice good security is hard. Really hard. It would be difficult enough if the technology environment remained constant for a while, but we all know how often that happens.

That's why it's especially important that we focus on raising user awareness of basic security concepts that are independent of specific technologies. One example is helping people understand what needs to be protected and why. I have encapsulated the basics of this in a mnemonic I call "The Four Cs."

The Four Cs are computers, credentials, connections, and content. If you can get your users into a mind set of thinking about protection in these four areas, then it will be one small but important step toward a secure chair-to-keyboard interface.

Let's review each of the Cs in a bit more detail. I use the term "computers" as shorthand because it also includes smartphones and tablets. Users have to understand that sensitive data is only as secure as the device used to access it. Ask them to imagine an attacker who can see everything they do on their home PCs -- can the attacker see customer data or trade secrets? If so, what are users doing to make sure this doesn't happen?

Credentials include passwords, security tokens, and anything else users need to log into company or work-related systems. Again, ask your users to imagine the worst. What are users trusted to do or see on behalf of the company? What might a motivated enemy do with the same access? What would happen to the user whose credentials were used to carry out a successful attack?

With all the publicity around the NSA leaks, it should be easy to get users interested in connection security. Encourage them to shift their thinking from government snoops to garden-variety criminals and industrial saboteurs. Would your users (deliberately) leave customer data or proprietary information sitting unattended on a table in a hotel lobby? If not, they shouldn't leave it floating around unencrypted on the hotel Wi-Fi, either.

Content protection is about which data goes where. Remind users how easy it is to forward an email or send a file to someone, sometimes even accidentally. Perhaps they shouldn't make it that easy for a colleague or third party to do the same with patient records or customer credit card numbers. Content protection also ties into the previous three areas: should important information be stored someplace that requires only a single shared password to access it? Do users trust the security of their computers as much as the security of the company's servers?

Too often, user education about security starts with the how, skipping right over the what and the why. The Four Cs don't cover every important aspect of user behavior; resistance to social engineering, for example, is notably absent. They do, however, offer a solid base of understanding for how users contribute to an organization's collective security. Once this idea is in users' heads, the questions about how to protect the computers, credentials, connections, and content will inevitably follow.

And those are the questions that any security professional should be happy to hear. Maxim Weinstein, CISSP, is a technologist and educator with a passion for information security. He works in product marketing at Sophos, where he specializes in server protection solutions. He is also a board member and former executive director of StopBadware. Maxim lives ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Flash Poll
Current Issue
Cartoon
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-0640
Published: 2014-08-20
EMC RSA Archer GRC Platform 5.x before 5.5 SP1 allows remote authenticated users to bypass intended restrictions on resource access via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2014-0641
Published: 2014-08-20
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in EMC RSA Archer GRC Platform 5.x before 5.5 SP1 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users.

CVE-2014-2505
Published: 2014-08-20
EMC RSA Archer GRC Platform 5.x before 5.5 SP1 allows remote attackers to trigger the download of arbitrary code, and consequently change the product's functionality, via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2014-2511
Published: 2014-08-20
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in EMC Documentum WebTop before 6.7 SP1 P28 and 6.7 SP2 before P14 allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the (1) startat or (2) entryId parameter.

CVE-2014-2515
Published: 2014-08-20
EMC Documentum D2 3.1 before P24, 3.1SP1 before P02, 4.0 before P11, 4.1 before P16, and 4.2 before P05 does not properly restrict tickets provided by D2GetAdminTicketMethod and D2RefreshCacheMethod, which allows remote authenticated users to gain privileges via a request for a superuser ticket.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Dark Reading continuing coverage of the Black Hat 2014 conference brings interviews and commentary to Dark Reading listeners.