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4/7/2017
09:00 AM
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New Malware Deliberately Destroys Unsecured IoT Devices

Motive behind BrickerBot puzzles experts who think it maybe the work of a vigilante.

Cybersecurity experts are warning of a new type of malware strain that uses known default user credentials to attack unsecured Internet of Things (IoT) devices and destroy them, reports Bleeping Computer.

Discovered by cybersecurity firm Radware, BrickerBot has two versions – BrickerBot.1 and BrickerBot.2 – and was found to be active since March 20, targeting only Linux BusyBox-based devices with Telnet ports left open.

This malware renders devices inoperable within seconds of infecting them through PDoS (Permanent Denial of Service) or "phlashing" attacks. The two versions work in the same manner but through different sets of commands; while BrickerBot.1 comes through worldwide IPs likely assigned to Ubiquiti network devices, BrickerBot.2 attacks are hidden behind Tor exit nodes and difficult to trace.

The attacker’s motive has confounded cybersecurity experts because it destroys without benefiting the destroyer. They suspect it could be the work of a vigilante who wants to alert users to unsecured devices.

Victor Gevers of GDI.foundation is however critical of the approach and believes that, "Instead of bricking you could also allow the devices to still work and just patch the vulnerability.”

Click here for details.

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JesseP882
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JesseP882,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/8/2017 | 7:34:58 PM
You cant fix stupid
Look, I understand the perspective that as people in IT Security we should make it our buisness to fix everyones issue. But you can't fix stupid nor can you protect everyone from themselves. Sorry Victor Gevers. But even in law enforcement, you can put as many fixes (checkstops) in place as possible, work to get laws setup and rules. But when someone decides to get drunk then drive behind the wheel, even police cannot stop every idiot drunk from killing innocents.

This malware, while appearing to be malicious in nature, is truly epic. No one is hurt, besides the victims pockbook/wallet, and nothing is gained from the attack. And the only true lesson learned here is this: Change the default password.

 

Awesome! And if buddy goes, gets new hardware and then refuses to change the password which again results in another infection and bricking of hardware again.... Sucks to be him.

What can we do? We cannot protect against stupid. Only educate and inform. We could be dictators. But then we would be no better than Microsoft was back in the day or Apple when the systems were locked down to prevent mods. So important lessons need to be learned. Always change the default password. Failure to do so will result in your own monetary loss due to your own idiocy.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
4/7/2017 | 2:31:11 PM
Push in the right direction
Hopefully this will push vendors in the right direction to not supply their devices with default credentials.
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