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7/27/2018
11:50 AM
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'Fancy Bear' Targets Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill

Russian hackers have their sights on McCaskill and her staff as they gear up for her 2018 re-election campaign.

Fancy Bear, a cyber espionage group believed to operate out of the Russian military agency GRU, has reportedly targeted Senator Claire McCaskill and her staff as they prepare for her 2018 reelection campaign.

This makes McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat, the first named target of Russia's 2018 election meddling, according to a report by The Daily Beast. Many consider her vulnerable given her past criticism of Russia; she has repeatedly accused the Kremlin of "cyber warfare against our democracy" and referred to Russian President Vladimir Putin as a "thug" and a "bully."

Attackers hit McCaskill's campaign with a variant of the password-stealing tactic Fancy Bear used against John Podesta in 2016, the report said. Senate staffers received fake notification emails instructing them to change their Microsoft Exchange passwords. If they clicked, targets were sent to a page disguised to belong to the US Senate's Active Directory Federation Services login. Each phishing email was tailored to its recipient's email address.

Microsoft first reported three hacking attempts on the midterm elections late last week. Experts earlier this year detected a fake Microsoft domain had been registered as a landing page for attacks against midterm candidates, though they didn't identify them at the time.

McCaskill released a statement that said the cyberattack was unsuccessful.

Read more details here.

 

 

 

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LaptopCharger
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LaptopCharger,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/1/2018 | 2:52:10 AM
Re: Passwords
Another example of username/password not being a good security countermeasure.many people are very curious about this issue in password.

https://laptopcharger.ae/

 
besquare
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besquare,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2018 | 12:18:10 PM
Re: Password change
"Need to switch to MFA." - 100% agreed
BrianN060
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BrianN060,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2018 | 11:31:05 AM
Re: Solve all problems - click here
If you want to trick users into doing what you want them to do, just ask them to do it by the easiest possible method, one that requires no thought, time or effort. 

"Your bank" tells you there's suspicious activity concerning your account, and you should contact them (they're not asking for your account info or password - they figure you're not dumb enough for that, any more).  For your convenience, they include a link.  What do you do?  Go online or call your bank directly, or click? 

"Your company" informs you that [insert anything that would get or require your attention], and offers a link for more information.  What do you do, verify independently, or click the link?

Want to solve all your problems, and the worlds?  Hey!  If all it takes is to "click here"....

Not only have most user education efforts failed to warn against taking the easy road; legitimate application development has accustomed users to expect that road (their daily commute), to be clearly marked, free of traffic and lined with palm trees. 

So, user education efforts have been successful: in teaching them that clicking a button or link will fulfill every wish, satisfy every requirement, or solve every problem - faster than the speed of thought
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2018 | 11:22:16 AM
Re: Password change
'"Senate staffers received fake notification emails instructing them to change their Microsoft Exchange passwords. " This is a tricky, users expects these types of email that is why it would be successful. Need to switch to MFA.'

 

Another helpful trick is security awareness. Educating your users what to look for in phishing attempts and the authorized means of how certain processes will be performed at that entity/organization. In this case password expiration/password reset.

 

 
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2018 | 11:19:21 AM
Re: Passwords
Weakest form of authentication and yet they are still abundantly in use.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2018 | 11:18:48 AM
Poking the "Bear"
I've always made references to poking the bear as it pertains to honeypots and honeynets but the principle is sustained here....literally. It is no surprise that the first target towards nefarious activity would be the individual that has directly referenced constituents of the Bear. Hopefully, we can ensure that the first amendment is preserved and does not cause hindrance towards this election process.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2018 | 9:08:10 AM
Password change
Senate staffers received fake notification emails instructing them to change their Microsoft Exchange passwords. This is a tricky, users expects these types of email that is why it would be successful. Need to switch to MFA.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2018 | 9:05:42 AM
Re: It's True!
Especially if they are beyond the reach of any consequences. This is one of the main reasons we keep experiencing these types of attacks, no consequence.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2018 | 9:04:42 AM
Re: It's True!
If your information is valuable, someone is motivated to get it. That is a good point. In the this case I think they are trying to make a political point.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2018 | 9:03:28 AM
Re: It's True!
"No amount of outrage, existing or new laws, will protect you. I would agree, that is where we need to start, what do we do so likeyhood of attack minimized.
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