Endpoint

5/16/2017
02:15 PM
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DocuSign's Brand Used in Phishing Attacks

The electronic signature company issued an update alert today that it noticed a rise in phishing attacks last week and this morning.

DocuSign has posted an update alert that a phishing attack launched last week using a bogus version of its brand continues to spread today.

The spoofed-DocuSign branded emails contain a nefarious Word attachment. The malicious software steals email addresses, but doesn't take names, physical addresses, passwords, social security numbers, credit card data, or other information, DocuSign stated in its blog post.

DocuSign said only its non-core system that allow the company to send out email announcements to customers was breached, and that its core eSignature service, envelopes, and documents remain secure.

Users should delete any emails with subject lines that read: "Completed: [domain name]  – Wire transfer for recipient-name Document Ready for Signature” and “Completed [domain name/email address] – Accounting Invoice [Number] Document Ready for Signature," the company stated. DocuSign also advised users to be on the lookout for emails that contain misspellings like "docusgn.com" without an "i," or @docus.com.

Read more about the DocuSign phishing attack here.

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