Endpoint

4/16/2015
05:00 PM
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7 Deadly Sins That Get Users Hacked

How users and their endpoints are leveraged by the bad guys to eventually find their way to critical data
1 of 8

Image: (Pixabay)
Image: (Pixabay)

1 of 8
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pawan14
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pawan14,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/8/2015 | 4:21:42 AM
Re: Username/password is main problem
The long we continue to user Username/password combination the worse these situation will get. 
SashKhe
50%
50%
SashKhe,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/23/2015 | 7:27:30 AM
Re: Username/password is main problem
If people would start using key-patterns instead of letter patterns as password, that would help too.
Example, "draw" a circle on your keyboard, every second key pressed is with shift - you just made a strong password that's as easy to remember as looking at your keyboard.
SashKhe
50%
50%
SashKhe,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/23/2015 | 7:24:54 AM
Re: Username/password is main problem
Don't forget the salt.
MarkSitkowski
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50%
MarkSitkowski,
User Rank: Moderator
4/20/2015 | 11:40:45 PM
Re: Username/password is main problem
I agree - and so do thousands of others, probably.

Thing is, it's not even necessary to send anything meaningful. Imagine, that you have a secret word, which only you know. Now imagine you are presented with an alphabet, under which is a random array of 0's and 1's. You enter the pattern corresponding to your secret word, which won't be the same next time you login, as the 0's and 1's are random.

Oh, yes, just in case anyone is listening on the network, you don't send the solution, you just send its SHA256 hash.

Isn't that better than passwords?
cyclepro
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50%
cyclepro,
User Rank: Strategist
4/20/2015 | 9:07:04 AM
hacking
One other way that was not mentioned is through Instant Messaging.

 

I always just delete any messages where I do not recognize the person.

 
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
4/18/2015 | 11:11:24 AM
Re: Fake phone calls
Nice tactic. You can also tell them what a good service they acre providing and you want to send kudos to their bosses if they can provide phone number for that. You never know, they may be providing real number of their boss.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
4/18/2015 | 11:07:50 AM
Re: Fake phone calls
I tend to do the same thing, not answering any unknown and waiting for voice message for the number I do not recognize. It is safer and saving time that way.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
4/18/2015 | 11:05:40 AM
Re: Fake phone calls
I like the idea, keeping them on the line until they hang up. Or giving the all the fake information so they can continue their effort.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
4/18/2015 | 11:02:35 AM
Username/password is main problem
The long we continue to user Username/password combination the worse these situation will get. Today, most common attacks are phishing and social engineering attacks on the end-users side, even these attacks are the results of the fact tags we use username/password combination. We need to find out a way to get rid of it or move the next level such as two or three factor authentication.
SmarterThanTheAverageBear
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50%
SmarterThanTheAverageBear,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/17/2015 | 7:55:31 PM
Re: Fake phone calls
Tell them your boss wants to hear more about their services and you are going to forward their call to him then forward them to the FBI/NSA or one of the otgher alphabet soups :)
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
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