Endpoint

3/27/2017
09:45 AM
50%
50%

40% of Discarded Digital Devices Contain Personal Data

NAID study of 250 devices in resale markets found tablets contained the most recoverable personal information.

An eye-opener of a study by the National Association for Information Destruction (NAID) has found that 40% of digital devices available in second-hand markets for resale carry personal identifiable information (PII) unintentionally left behind by the user. Of the over 250 devices examined, tablets contained 50% of recoverable PII; hard drives, 44%; and mobile phones, 13%.

According to John Benkert of CPR Tools, whose firm was commissioned to conduct the research: "Auction, resell, and recycling sites have created a convenient revenue stream in used devices; however, the real value is in the data that the public unintentionally leaves behind."

Recovered data, from devices used in both commercial and personal environment, include usernames and passwords, credit card information, and company and tax details.

Interestingly, the researchers used very basic methods to recover the stored data and came up with this figure. "Imagine if we had asked our forensics agency to actually dig," says Robert Johnson of NAID. "40 percent is horrifying when you consider the millions of devices that are recycled annually."

Read full story here

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Russia Hacked Clinton's Computers Five Hours After Trump's Call
Robert Lemos, Technology Journalist/Data Researcher,  4/19/2019
Why We Need a 'Cleaner Internet'
Darren Anstee, Chief Technology Officer at Arbor Networks,  4/19/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-18643
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-25
GitLab CE & EE 11.2 and later and before 11.5.0-rc12, 11.4.6, and 11.3.10 have Persistent XSS.
CVE-2018-19359
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-25
GitLab Community and Enterprise Edition 8.9 and later and before 11.5.0-rc12, 11.4.6, and 11.3.10 has Incorrect Access Control.
CVE-2019-11488
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-25
Incorrect Access Control in the Account Access / Password Reset Link in SimplyBook.me Enterprise before 2019-04-23 allows Unauthorized Attackers to READ/WRITE Customer or Administrator data via a persistent HTTP GET Request Hash Link Replay, as demonstrated by a login-link from the browser history.
CVE-2019-11489
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-25
Incorrect Access Control in the Administrative Management Interface in SimplyBook.me Enterprise before 2019-04-23 allows Authenticated Low-Priv Users to Elevate Privileges to Full Admin Rights via a crafted HTTP PUT Request, as demonstrated by modified JSON data to a /v2/rest/ URI.
CVE-2019-3720
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-25
Dell EMC Open Manage System Administrator (OMSA) versions prior to 9.3.0 contain a Directory Traversal Vulnerability. A remote authenticated malicious user with admin privileges could potentially exploit this vulnerability to gain unauthorized access to the file system by exploiting insufficient san...