News
3/13/2008
09:10 PM
Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

What Sticks

And what doesn't in the startup world doesn't appear to have much to do with technology. Like in sports, whoever can deliver on the fundamentals -- in this case, basic business fundamentals, stands a better chance of thriving in the market.

And what doesn't in the startup world doesn't appear to have much to do with technology. Like in sports, whoever can deliver on the fundamentals -- in this case, basic business fundamentals, stands a better chance of thriving in the market.OK, so that last sentence may read as appallingly self-evident. But it emerges time and again in this self-assessment Byte & Switch did of its top 10 startups from the summer of 2007. Where companies fell short wasn't because the technology was ahead of its time or too complex (yeah, right -- like that ever stopped a storage vendor with an idea).

It was because the business parts misfired.

Swiss vendor Agite Software lost its American distributor for reasons it doesn't really care to discuss. Open-source management vendor Qlusters swapped out CEOs and is equally loathe to parse the reasons. In both cases, incompatibilities that had nothing to do with interfaces or protocols or technology.

And is coyness a business strategy? Ocarina seems to think so. Better to drop it and test whether its broad-based compression has any real legs in the marketplace. (Coming, the CEO says.)

Startups that have won reseller and OEM deals (a revenue cornerstone for any startup) look to be most squarely on the road to longevity. Clustered IP vendor Pivot3's done relatively well here, but ProStor has really excelled with partners and OEM deals for its removable media solution.

Too often we as an industry get overly focused on whether technology will work or find acceptance in the marketplace. That line of thinking only addresses half the challenge. How good the business execution is going to be is a far harder issue to judge, especially with companies like these that have no track record.

The business of storage is, still, business.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading Must Reads - September 25, 2014
Dark Reading's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of identity and access management. Learn about access control in the age of HTML5, how to improve authentication, why Active Directory is dead, and more.
Flash Poll
10 Recommendations for Outsourcing Security
10 Recommendations for Outsourcing Security
Enterprises today have a wide range of third-party options to help improve their defenses, including MSSPs, auditing and penetration testing, and DDoS protection. But are there situations in which a service provider might actually increase risk?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2012-5485
Published: 2014-09-30
registerConfiglet.py in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote attackers to execute Python code via unspecified vectors, related to the admin interface.

CVE-2012-5486
Published: 2014-09-30
ZPublisher.HTTPRequest._scrubHeader in Zope 2 before 2.13.19, as used in Plone before 4.3 beta 1, allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary HTTP headers via a linefeed (LF) character.

CVE-2012-5487
Published: 2014-09-30
The sandbox whitelisting function (allowmodule.py) in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote authenticated users with certain privileges to bypass the Python sandbox restriction and execute arbitrary Python code via vectors related to importing.

CVE-2012-5488
Published: 2014-09-30
python_scripts.py in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote attackers to execute Python code via a crafted URL, related to createObject.

CVE-2012-5489
Published: 2014-09-30
The App.Undo.UndoSupport.get_request_var_or_attr function in Zope before 2.12.21 and 3.13.x before 2.13.11, as used in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1, allows remote authenticated users to gain access to restricted attributes via unspecified vectors.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In our next Dark Reading Radio broadcast, we’ll take a close look at some of the latest research and practices in application security.