News
3/13/2008
09:10 PM
Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

What Sticks

And what doesn't in the startup world doesn't appear to have much to do with technology. Like in sports, whoever can deliver on the fundamentals -- in this case, basic business fundamentals, stands a better chance of thriving in the market.

And what doesn't in the startup world doesn't appear to have much to do with technology. Like in sports, whoever can deliver on the fundamentals -- in this case, basic business fundamentals, stands a better chance of thriving in the market.OK, so that last sentence may read as appallingly self-evident. But it emerges time and again in this self-assessment Byte & Switch did of its top 10 startups from the summer of 2007. Where companies fell short wasn't because the technology was ahead of its time or too complex (yeah, right -- like that ever stopped a storage vendor with an idea).

It was because the business parts misfired.

Swiss vendor Agite Software lost its American distributor for reasons it doesn't really care to discuss. Open-source management vendor Qlusters swapped out CEOs and is equally loathe to parse the reasons. In both cases, incompatibilities that had nothing to do with interfaces or protocols or technology.

And is coyness a business strategy? Ocarina seems to think so. Better to drop it and test whether its broad-based compression has any real legs in the marketplace. (Coming, the CEO says.)

Startups that have won reseller and OEM deals (a revenue cornerstone for any startup) look to be most squarely on the road to longevity. Clustered IP vendor Pivot3's done relatively well here, but ProStor has really excelled with partners and OEM deals for its removable media solution.

Too often we as an industry get overly focused on whether technology will work or find acceptance in the marketplace. That line of thinking only addresses half the challenge. How good the business execution is going to be is a far harder issue to judge, especially with companies like these that have no track record.

The business of storage is, still, business.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Threat Intel Today
Threat Intel Today
The 397 respondents to our new survey buy into using intel to stay ahead of attackers: 85% say threat intelligence plays some role in their IT security strategies, and many of them subscribe to two or more third-party feeds; 10% leverage five or more.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2010-5110
Published: 2014-08-29
DCTStream.cc in Poppler before 0.13.3 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (crash) via a crafted PDF file.

CVE-2012-1503
Published: 2014-08-29
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Six Apart (formerly Six Apart KK) Movable Type (MT) Pro 5.13 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the comment section.

CVE-2013-5467
Published: 2014-08-29
Monitoring Agent for UNIX Logs 6.2.0 through FP03, 6.2.1 through FP04, 6.2.2 through FP09, and 6.2.3 through FP04 and Monitoring Server (ms) and Shared Libraries (ax) 6.2.0 through FP03, 6.2.1 through FP04, 6.2.2 through FP08, 6.2.3 through FP01, and 6.3.0 through FP01 in IBM Tivoli Monitoring (ITM)...

CVE-2014-0600
Published: 2014-08-29
FileUploadServlet in the Administration service in Novell GroupWise 2014 before SP1 allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files via the poLibMaintenanceFileSave parameter, aka ZDI-CAN-2287.

CVE-2014-0888
Published: 2014-08-29
IBM Worklight Foundation 5.x and 6.x before 6.2.0.0, as used in Worklight and Mobile Foundation, allows remote authenticated users to bypass the application-authenticity feature via unspecified vectors.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
This episode of Dark Reading Radio looks at infosec security from the big enterprise POV with interviews featuring Ron Plesco, Cyber Investigations, Intelligence & Analytics at KPMG; and Chris Inglis & Chris Bell of Securonix.